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SIMMONS COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 

The Gift of 

Board of Editors 



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Editor-in-Chief 

ELEANOR DEMIRJIAN 

* • • 
Associate Editors 

CONSTANCE RAMSDELL 
MARY WHALEN 

Art Editor 

MIRIAM TUTON 

Photographic Editor 

BERNICE DIAMOND 

• * * 
Circulation Manager 

JEAN GREENHALGH 

Business Manager 

ISABEL CALUSDIAN 

Advertising Manager 

ANN MICHELSON 

Faculty Advisors 

MR. WILFRED E. PLAYFAIR 
MR. F. WYLIE SYPHER 





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Profes.ica. „„„,e„ oh„.c,e riz e m ore 
and more the type of person who grad- 
uates from Simmons. We, the class of 
1945, have had added to our own pro- 
fessional slant on life the seriousness 
of war. We have done our best to com- 
bine our war activities with colleg 
programs, and the 1945 issue of 
Microcosm has attempted to reflect this 
combination. 

The carefree Freshman, after four 
long years of study, emerges a polished 
graduate, ready for a career in her 
chosen profession. We sincerely hope 
that we shall be capable of shouldering 
the responsibilities of our future. 






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Model: John A. Tinnn 
Exclusive coiffure: Styled by Stiles 



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tf-osi Jla wa MemoA 



Every fall traditional step-singing held on the 
colonnade steps attracted commuters and dorm 
students alike. As November approached, prepa- 
rations for Mic Dance, first all-college dance of the 
year, were started. Thanksgiving vacation past, 
the refectory echoed with laughter at the antics of 
the jesters at Olde English Dinner. Following the 
presentation of the Christmas pageant and carol- 
singing, Christmas holidays began. 

As a break in classroom routine, News Dance 
supplied an evening of pleasure at its twenty-first 
birthday ball. Faculty members and seniors dined 
informally at the Senior-Faculty Supper in April, 
and May Day brought the Sophomore-Senior 
Strawberry Breakfast and tree-planting. 

The All-College Field Day, with the Student- 
Faculty Baseball Game, and May Party wound up 
a very successful school year, and everyone began 
vacation after finals. 




Serenade in blue and gold 



Ye merrie maids of Simmons 





ana out . . . Abound and about . . . 



vi 



^Ite Italll off Binunatti 



In spite of the ever-present emphasis on classes 
and careers, Simmons girls still find time to sink 
into the familiar green leather chairs in the 
Lounge and run out for a candy bar at Showcase. 
While a few stop to admire the display of college 
banners, the familiar cry of "What have you got 
to eat?" rings in the halls. 

For every one who has the ambition and the 
energy to make the four-flight climb to the library, 
there's another who is cramming hastily for an 
exam in the butt room or in a vacant class room 
on the first floor. 

The traditional twelve o'clock rush in the 
cafeteria always finds a line of hungry people 
waiting for their chance at the food. 

In the early fall and late spring, the back steps 
are a favorite haunt of professors and students, 
smoking and chatting. On sunny days, the lawn is 
covered with sun-worshippers and outdoor classes. 

"Meet me at Info!" is the cry that jams the 
front hall with time-conscious students. 




Bun io n s fo r o n ions . 
Corns for corn . . . 



Not a class in a carload 




13] 




/ a 4M>e>M44,-<i&-CLk(U4MdL . . . 



Butts. 



The door of 052A opens on a cloud of smoke and 
an exultant cry of "Two spades!" Inside, the 
benches are crowded with girls intently discussing 
anything from men to Marx. Around the tables, 
willing kibitzers bid the nearest available bridge 
hand. 

Right next door, you can find books, bags, and 
butts in the Simmons College Cooperative Store, 
otherwise known as the Book Store. 

Upstairs, the first-floor traffic comes to a stop 
at the note board as students gather to pick up 
mail, invitations, and an occasional summons. A 
glance at the official blackboard discloses any cuts 
or unscheduled meetings. Poster Row, with its 
colorful display, provides information about class 
or club meetings as well as approaching social 
events. 

Each week finds a schedule of all club meetings 
and teas; all-college dances are anticipated by 
everyone, as are the bi-monthly teas held at Evans 
for the benefit of commuters and dorm students 
alike. 



Books . 



Billets. . 




[14] 




[16] 




ijje Ut a fCnxuidedcfe fyacUosuf, 



Classes — most gals go, some don't. Neverthe- 
less, they're an ever-present necessity to any col- 
lege. Look into the average lecture at Simmons 
and you'll find some girls furiously writing notes. 
Others are gazing abstractedly out the window, 
some writing letters or knitting on the perennial 
sweater, but no one misses the punch lines of lec- 
tures. 

The contrast between types of classroom lec- 
tures is terrific: There's the class which brings on 
an acute case of writer's cramp, after 45 minutes 
of pencil-on-paper routine. Then there's the dis- 
cussion class, otherwise known as the "knock 'em 
down and drag 'em out" type. 

Lab classes run for hours on end. There are the 
biology labs in which students dissect anything 
from cats to rats; the physics labs where pulleys 
and horsepower come with the lingo; the chemistry 
labs with their everlasting hydrogen sulphide and 
the home ec labs, whose delicious odors make 
mouths water. 

From business classes come the sounds of type- 
writers and machines, from publishing classes the 
cries of "Bleed!" or "Crop!" Throw them all 
together and you have an interesting and accurate 
cross section of Simmons. 

Classes — all kinds — all the time. 



Spots before our eyes 
The meat shortage 




It pays to be ignorant 




[17] 









awst 5-itci/i> 



Smoothest Girl 

MARILYN MATSON 
HARRIET TRAUB 



Skirt and Sweater Girl 
MARTHA STILES 
JANE CURTIN 




Sally-of-all-trades 
MARY GRUBE 
IRENE SAINT 



Most Popular 

JOAN MELBER 
JANE REYNOLDS 




V-Mail Girl 

EMILY BERKE 
JANE REYNOLDS 





Success Story 




IRENE SAINT 




MARY GRUBE 


s 


Best-natured 


v- * 


ELAINE PALMER 


* 


LUCILLE LUNDY 




and 


h, 


BARBARA HARLOW 






• 






' 




lu^x&nlatio&l 



Easiest-on-t he-eyes 

JANE REYNOLDS 
MARILYN MATSON 




Wittiest 

MARTHA STILES 
LUCILLE LUNDY 




Most Radical 

IRENE SAINT 
EMILY LEHRMANN 




Most Changed 

CONSTANCE RAMSDELL 

and 
CLOVER JELLIS 




Most Cosmopolitan 

HARRIET TRAUB 
BETTE EMHOFF 



I woap HAWt 
PREFfRfB 





Favorite Professor 

WARREN TRYON 
ROSS LO( KRIDGE 



Friendliest 

JOAN MELBER 
JUNE WHITFIELD 







/ 






wnmencement . . . the etui and yet the 



Senior Week climaxes four years of hard work 
and much fun. Seniors reign as queens of the cam- 
pus in this last week at Simmons. Class Day on 
Saturday starts the events of the weekend rolling. 
Garden Party, where seniors and their guests are 
served light refreshments, is followed by Daisy 
Chain, after which the seniors give up their places 
on the Colonnade steps to the juniors. Tradition- 
ally, the seniors plant ivy in honor of their class, 
and wind up the day with Class Day Dance. 

Sunday brings Baccalaureate and the Presi- 
dent's Reception on campus, and on Monday, the 
day of days, we finally receive those coveted 
sheepskins. Seniors follow the solemn ceremony 
and lucky seniors circle the Rose Table. 

And now it's over — the classes, the cramming, 
the dances, the papers, the dates and the rush for 
classes — the work and play. The year is over. 
Exit 1945, enter 1946—. 



Intermission 



Seniors on parade 




20 | 



— 



Oe<jA<4iM44Uf, 




Ready for service and worthy of trust 



BACCALAUREATE 

June 10, 1945 
The Reverend Carl Heath Kopf 

COMMENCEMENT 

June 11, 1945 

Lt.-Gov. Robert Fiske Bradford 



On the way upward 
Dignitaries in procession 
Lift we our song to thee 




[ 21 




President Bancroft Beatley, 
recognized for his friendly and 
modern outlook, is the con- 
necting link between the stu- 
dent body and the Corpora- 
tion of Simmons. He enters 
whole-heartedly into student 
affairs and activities at dances, 
suppers, teas, and, of course, 
the annual Faculty-Student 
baseball game, where he dis- 
tinguishes himself as star 
pitcher, batter, and all-round 
spark plug of the team. 

Although he is extremely 
active in educational fields and 
in the civilian war effort, he 
still finds time to swing a mean 
ping-pong paddle in the an- 
nual tournaments. 
President Beatley is outstanding 
for his tact and delightful sense of 
humor, and never fails to greet students 
with a cheery "Hello" as he passes in 
the corridor. 

Typifying his awareness of the im- 
portance of student opinion in mould- 
ing the college policy was his consulta- 
tion with the Student Government 
Council about the proposed increase 
in tuition. It is actions like this that 
have endeared him to the students. 






*Sto**$m***r*>' 



**. 





The Simmons Corporation was organized in 1899, carrying out 
the wishes of the founder of the college, John Simmons. Guided by 
the watchwords, "Art, Science, and Industry," the Corporation 
holds several yearly meetings to discuss questions of administra- 
tion, finance, and property. 

Its twenty-five members include: Henry Lefavour, Ph.D., LL.D. ; 
John Washburn Bartol, A.B., M.D., Emeritus; Mary Eleanor 
Williams; Henry Edmund Bothfield; Carl Dreyfus, A.B.; William 
Emerson, A.B., Art.D., Chairman; John Stanley Ames, A.B., M.F.; 
William Brooks Baker, A.B., LL.B., Clerk; Bancroft Beatley, 





^c^^^i^^a^^, i4^eAiUU+Uf the 



Dean Jane Louise Mesick 



Ed.D., Litt.D., LL.D., President of the College; 
Erwin Haskell Schell, S.B.; Rosamond Lamb; 
Richard Mason Smith, A.B., M.D., S.D.; Ruth 
Hornblower Greenough, A.B.; Charles Belcher 
Rugg, A.M., LL.B.; Elisabeth McArthur Shepard, 
S.B.; Robert Fiske Bradford, A.B., LL.B.; Rich- 
mond Knowlton Bachelder, B.B.A., Treasurer; 
Abbie Edith Dunks, S.B.; Arthur Perry, A.B.; 
Eleanor Cassidy Keegan, S.B.; Eleanor Hay- 
ward, S.B., M.B.A.; Joseph Timothy Walker, Jr., 
A.B.; Marion Edwards Park, Ph.D., LL.D.; Helen 
Sargent Shaw, S.B.; Harold Daniel Hodgkinson, 
Ph.B. 

The Administration is responsible for carrying 
out the established policies of the Corporation. 
President Bancroft Beatley's duties are in the 
fields of administration, instruction, and college 
policy. 

Dean Jane Louise Mesick is an understanding 
director of student welfare, scholarships, and 
residence. Her office door is always open to the 
students who wish to discuss their problems, pro- 
jects, or complaints with her, and she always lends 
a helping hand. 

Since 1940, Dr. James Mead Hyatt, Ph.D., 
Professor of Physics, has been Dean of the Gradu- 
ate Division of Simmons. 

Working as a coordinated unit are three offices : 
The Office of the Registrar, the Main Office, and 
the Office of Admission and Guidance. Under the 
direction of Mrs. Margaret Gonyea, the Regis- 
trar's Office deals with arranging each student's 
program of classes and issuing bulletins of infor- 



James Mead Hyatt 

Dean of the Graduate Division 

Anne McIIenry Hopkins 

Director of Health 

Ruth Danielson 

Director of Residence 

Alice Hopkins 

Director of the Library 

Doris M. Sutherland 

Director of Admission and Guidance 

Richmond K. Batchelder 

Comptroller 





[24] 



colUae psvoatiam, 042jesixit&i the mcudtin&uf 



mation about the college, besides holding many 
individual conferences with college students 
throughout the fall and winter. 

In the Main Office, the problem of conflicting 
schedules is straightened out with the helpful 
assistance of Miss Jennings, Miss Grant, Miss 
Barrett, and Miss Belding. 

The Office of Admission and Guidance, pre- 
sided over by Miss Doris M. Sutherland and her 
able assistant, Miss Wry, interviews prospective 
Simmons students. Miss Sutherland is in charge of 
the College Opportunities Program, and also 
handles the problem of homesick Freshmen during 
the week of Orientation. 

The Recorder's Office, under the direction of 
Miss Marjorie Burbank, is the place where stu- 
dents' vital statistics are kept. Miss Burbank and 
her staff make out exam schedules and compute 
point accumulations. 

The Office of Public Relations, created in 1937 
by Mr. Wilfrid E. Playfair, is now conducted by 
Mrs. Pearl S. Young, who publicizes college 
events and distributes press releases. 

Simmons' own private bank is the Comptroller's 
Office, directed by Mr. Richmond K. Batchelder. 
Through this office go all checks, scholarships, and 
loans, as well as the very troublesome ration books 
for resident students. The staff supervises college 
buildings and controls student accounts and con- 
tracts. 

The Placement Office, created two years ago to 
coordinate all student placement, is supervised by 
Miss Anna M. Hanson. In her office she keeps a 




At lunch 





.1 


i 


l» 


Nsfll 








[25] 



an 



& attendU to tke weljjGSie o£ alt tlia&e 



file of the qualifications of students and alumnae, 
as well as a file of potential positions. This cen- 
tralization is invaluable now that trained women 
are in such demand in all the business and profes- 
sional fields. 

The Health Office, under the direction of Dr. 
Anne McHenry Hopkins, cures all minor student 
ailments and conducts the yearly physical exam- 
inations of Freshmen and Seniors. In the Health 
Laboratory, Mrs. Mary Hill tests blood and 
studies X-ray results. 

The Alumnae Association, presided over by 
Mrs. Helena V. O'Brien, is represented at the 
college by Miss Marjorie L. Shea, executive secre- 
tary of the association. She supervises alumnae 
reunions and edits the Simmons Review. The 
Association also makes two awards annually to 
outstanding Seniors. 

Libraries A and B, 'way up on the fourth floor, 
are very busy places. Miss Alice Hopkins, with the 
able assistance of Mrs. Bloom, Miss Frost, and 
Mrs. Mutch, takes care of the 80,000 volumes in 
the main building. She 




Endorse it on the back, please" 






at Simmosti,. 




• Not another conflict! 
Always a smile and a reach/ answer 



logues and takes charge of the newspaper, poster, 
and book exhibits in the main hall between the 
libraries. 

The Cafeteria, in the basement of the east wing, 
is waging a successful battle against shortages and 
rising prices of food, and still manages to supply 
the hungry Simmons population with tasty 
lunches. Fifth hour crowds are controlled by the 
student committee. 

Info has been a landmark of the main foyer ever 
since the College was built. No question phases its 
director. Miss Marie C. LaPorte, who also man- 
ages the switchboard. 

Keeping things running smoothly on upperclass 
and freshman campuses are Miss Ruth Danielson 
and Mrs. Frank C. Cooper, Directors of Resi- 
dence. In spite of wartime difficulties, Miss Daniel- 
son manages the eleven upperclass houses, and 
still finds time to take a friendly personal interest 
in all the girls. Mrs. Cooper takes Freshmen in 
hand from the first moment when they check into 
the dorms, alleviating their difficulties and con- 
fusions. 



27 




Ue fyaoulty . . . <IUifte4tAeAA a£ ^MualeJ^e 



gia Haugh Abbott, Ph.B. 
(Mrs. Arthur H. Abbott) 
Associate Professor of Textiles 

Helen Goller Adams, S.B., A.M. 
(Mrs. Frank \V. Adams) 
Associate Professor of Secretarial Studies 

Alexandra Adler, M.D. 

Special Lecturer on Social Psychiatry 
Eunice Flanagan Allan, A.B., M.S.S. 

(Mrs. Malcolm S. Allan) 

Special Lecturer on Psychiatric Social Work 
Nary Angela Bailey, S.B. 

Assistant in Library Science 
Diamond Ballin, S.B., A.M. 

Special Instructor in Diet Therapy 

Louise Silbert Bandler, A.B., M.S.S. 
(Mrs. Bernard Bandler) 
Special Instructor in Psychiatric Social Work 

Harriett Moulton Bartlett, A.M. 
Special Lecturer on Medical Social Work 

Edith Arthur Beckler, S.B. 

Assistant Professor of Public Health 
Kathleen Berger, S.B., Ed.M. 
(Mrs. Walter M. Berger) 

Assistant Professor of Secretarial Studies 

Grete Lehner Bibring, M.D. 

Special Lecturer on Analytic Psychology 

Roy Oren Billett, Ph.D. 

Lecturer on Education 

Elizabeth Eunice Bissell, A.B. 

Special Instructor in Child Welfare 

Allen Douglas Bliss, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

*Raymond Francis Bosworth, S.B., A.M. 

Assistant Professor of English 

Marion Edna Bowler, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages 
Augusta Fox Bronner, Ph.D. 
(Mrs. William Healy) 
Special Lecturer on Mental Hygiene 

Nina Caroline Brotherton, A.M. 
Professor of Library Science, and 
Acting Director of the School of Library Science 

Flossie C. Budewig, S.M. 
Instructor in Home Economics 

Lyle Kenneth Bush, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Art 

Theresa Kowalczyk Carroll, S.B. 
(Mrs. John Carroll) 
Assistant in Library Science 



"On leave of absence for war service 



Irene McAllister Chambers, Ph.B., A.M., S.B. 

Associate Professor of Retailing 

Alice Channing, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Social Economy 

Josephine M. Chapman, S.B., Ed.M. 
(Mrs. Boyd P. Chapman) 

Assistant Professor of Physicul Education 
Ruth Clapp, S.B. 

Instructor in Child Development, and 
Director of the Nursery School 

Virginia Oldach Cobb, B.S. in Ed. 
Special Instructor in Clothing 

Laura Catherine Colvin, A.B., A.M.L.S. 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 

Isabella Kellock Coulter, S.B., A.M. 
(Mrs. Jeremy A. Coulter) 
Assistant Professor of Secretarial Studies 

Alice Louise Crockett, A.M. 
Assistant Professor of English 

Mary Johnston Davidson, S.B. 

Special Instructor in Institutional Management 
Marguerite Bond Derry, S.B. 

(Mrs. C. Malcolm Derry) 

Special Instructor in Biology 

F"elix Deutsch, M.D. 

Special Lecturer on Social Psychiatry 

Florence Sophronia Diall 

Associate .Professor of Physical Education 

Tilly Svenson Dickinson, S.B., Ed.M. 
(Mrs. H. Donald Dickinson) 

Assistant Professor of Secretarial Studies 

Quindara Oliver Dodge, S.M. 
(Mrs. Chester C. Dodge) 

Associate Professor of Institutional Management 
and Director of Vocational Practice 

Marie Lois Donohoe, A.B. 

Special Lecturer on Mental Hygiene 

Virginia Marie Dunn, S.B. 

Assistant in Secretarial Studies 

Kathleen Cillis Dunning, S.B. 
(Mrs. Martin VanB. Dunning, Jr.) 
Special Instructor in Costume Design 

Sigrid Anderson Edge, A.B., S.M. 

Associate Professor of Library Science 

Jose Antonio Encinas, A.B. 
Special Instructor in Spanish 
Viola Grace Engler, S.B., M.B.A. 

Associate Professor of Accounting 

Vernon R. Esteves, A.M. 
Special Instructor in Economics 

Eula Gertrude Ferguson, A.B., S.B. 
Associate Professor of Secretarial Studies 



Quiet! 



men working! 




Donald LeSure F"essenden, A.B. 

Lecturer on Journalism 
Jacob Ellis F'inesinger, A.M., M.D. 

Special Lecturer on Social Psychiatry 

Lucy Ellis Fisher, S.M. 

Assistant Professor of Foods 

Ethel M. Fletcher, A.B. 

Special Instructor in Family Social Work 
Morhis Friedberg, A.M., Docteur de l'Universite 
de Paris 

Professor of Economics 

Ruth Bacheldek F'riedberg, A.B. S.M. 

(Mrs. Morris Friedberg) 

Associate Professor of Retailing 
Robert Malcolm Gay, A.M., Litt.D. 

Professor of English, Director of the School of 
English, and Chairman of the Division of Lan- 
guage, Literature, and the Arts 

Ina Mary Granara, S.B., A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Emerson Greenaway, S.B.. A.B.L.S. 

Lecturer on Library Organization and Administra- 
tion 

Barbara Johnson Hall, S.B. 

(Mrs. Albert C. Hall) 

Assistant in Chemistry 
Zoltan Haraszti, J.S.D., A.M. 

Lecturer on the History of the Book 

Katharine Davis Hardwick, A.B. 
Professor of Social Economy, and 
Director of the School of Social Work 

Rachel Louise Hardwick, S.B., Ch.B., M.D. 

(Mrs. James A. Burgess) 

Special Lecturer on Medical Information 
Harrison LeRoy Harley, Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophy and Psychology, Director 
of the School of Preprofessional Studies, and 
Chairman of the Dieision of Philosophy, Psychol- 
ogy, and Education 

Mary Kathryn Harrigan, S.B. 

Instructor in Biology 

Elizabeth Louisa Hart, S.B., R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing 

Claire de Hedervary, A.B. 

Instructor in Economics 

Edith Fishtine Helman, Ph.D. 
(Mrs. Bernard Helman) 
Associate Professor of Spanish 

Leland David Hemenway, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics and Physics 

F"rances Warner Hersey, A.B., Litt. D. 
(Mrs. Mayo D. Hersey) 
Lecturer on English 

Curtis Morrison Hilliard, A.B. 

Professor of Biology and Public Health 

William Augustus Hinton, S.B., M.D. 

Lecturer on Wasscrmann Technique 

Katharine Hitchcock, R.N., S.B., A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Public Health Nursinii 

Caroline Maude Holt, Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology 

Nellie Maria Hord, S.B.. A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Foods and Nutrition 

Roy Graham Hoskins, Ph.D., M.D. 
Special Lecturer on Social Psychiatry 

Emily Bissell Houghton, S.B. 
(Mrs. Kermit R. Houghton) 
Special Instructor in Sociology 

Ruth White Howe, S.B. 
(Mrs. Percy R. Howe) 

Special Instructor in Nutrition 

Alice Roth well Hyatt, S.B. 

(Mrs. James M. Hyatt) 
Instructor in Physics 

James Mead Hyatt. Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics and Dean of Graduates 

Flora McKenzie Jacobs 

Associate Professor of Secretarial Studies 

Harry Morton Johnson. A.M. 

Instructor in Sociology 

Carter Ruthven Jones 

Special Lecturer on Advertising 



28 



Cheney Church Jones. A.B., LL.D. 
Special Lecturer on Child Welfare 

'Raymond Kenneth Jones, S.M. 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

Florene Cora Kelly, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Howard Lamb Kingsley, Ph.D. 

Special Instructor in Psychology 

Mary Ramon Kinney, A.B., S.M. 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 

Manfred Klein, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of German 

Erich N. Labouvie, Ph.D. 
Special Instructor in German 

Ruth Shaw Leonard, S.B. 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 

"Winston Barnes Lewis, Ph.D. 
Instructor in History and Economics 

Alton A. Linford, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Social Economy 

Ross Franklin Lockridge, Jr., A.M. 

Assistant Professor of English 

Allena Estelle Luce, A.M. 
Special Instructor in Spanish 

Samuel Jesse Lukens, Ph.D. 

Professor of Business Economics, Director of the 
School of Business, and Director of the Prince 
School of Retailing 

Mary McDonald, R.N. 

Special Lecturer on Orthopedic Nursing 

Marjorie Marie McKinley, S.B. 

Supervisor of Vocational Practice 
Kate McMahon 

Associate Professor of Social Economy 
Gladys Waden Magee. S.B. 

(Mrs. Roland H. Magee) 

Instructor in Clothing and Design 

Judith Matlack, A.M. 

Associate Professor of English 
T. Spencer Meyer, A.B. 

Special Lecturer on Public Relations 

Virginia Rogers Miller, A.M. 
(Mrs. Carroll C. Miller) 
Special Instructor in English 

Ouida Crouse Montague, S.B. 

(Mrs. Ouida C. Montague) 

Special Instructor in Hospital laboratory Methods 
Ruth Conniston Morize, Mus.B. 

(Mrs. Andre Morize) 

Lecturer on the Appreciation of Music 

Evangeline Hall Morris. B.A., B.N., R.N. 

(Mrs. Cecil R. Morris) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Raymond Elwood Neal, S.B. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
"Joseph Garton Needham, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Malcolm Strong Nichols, A.B. 

Special Lecturer on Family Welfare 

Mary Elizabeth Norcross, R.N., S.B. 
Special Instructor in Nursing Education 

Helen Rich Norton, A.B. 

Professor of Retailing, and Associate Director of 
the Prince School of Retailing 
Helena Veronica O'Brien, S.B., LL.B. 
Special Instructor in Business Law 

Eleanor Manning O'Connor, S.B. 
(Mrs. Johnson O'Connor) 
Special Instructor in Housing 

Waldo Emerson Palmer, A.B. 

Associate Professor of History 

Eleanor Pavenstedt, M.D. 

Special Instructor in Social Psychiatry 

Wilfrid Ernest Playfair, B.A. 

Lecturer on Journalism 

Lalia Charlton Pratt, S.B. 
(Mrs. Lawrence H. Pratt) 
Special Instructor in Chemistry 




Relaxing between classes 



Marenda Elliott Prentis, A.M. 
Special Instructor in Sociology 

*0n leave of absence for war service 



S.B. 



Robert Carter Rankin, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 

Philip Morrison Richardson, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Biology 

Elda Robb, Ph.D. 

Professor of Nutrition, and Director of the School 
of Home Economics 

Leo Roberts, Ph.D. 
Lecturer on Psychology 

Natalie Atwill Robie, S.B. 

Assistant in Foods 
Howard Frank Root, A.B., M.D. 

Lecturer on Medical Information 

Louise Vernon Rosser, S.B. 
(Mrs. Bernard S. Rosser) 
Instructor in Physics and Mathematics 

Hanns Sachs, LL.D. 

Lecturer on Analytic Psychology 

Florence Celia Sargent, S.B., A.M. 
(Mrs. Sydney P. Sargent) 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Isabel Linscott Sargent, A.B. 
(Mrs. Ellwood W. Sargent) 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

Ruth Irma Schaufus, S.B. 

Assistant in Chemistry 
Ida Alice Sleeper, A.M. 

Associate Professor of English 

Julian Louis Solinger, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

Harry Caesar Solomon, S.B., M.D. 
Lecturer on Clinical Psychiatry 

Maida Herman Solomon, A.B., S.B. 
(Mrs. Harry C. Solomon) 
Assistant Professor of Social Economy 

Harriet Alden Southgate, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Emil George Spitzer, Dr.Juris., A.M. 

Special Instructor in History and Economics 

Patricia Horton Staley, A.B. 
(Mrs. Carroll H. Staley) 
Assistant in Chemistry 

Mary Catharine Starr, Ed.B., A.M. 

Instructor in Home Management and Child Devel- 
opment 

Howard Oliver Stearns, S.M. 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

George Nye Steiger, Ph.D. 

Professor of History, and Chairman of the Dii'ision 
of Social Studies 



Frances Stern, A.M. 

Special Instructor in Nutrition in Social Work 

Marjory Stimson, R.N., S.B., A.M. 

Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing 

Sara Henry Stites, Ph.D. 
Lecturer on Economics 

Jessie Mildred Stuart, S B. 
Assistant Professor of Retailing 

Jacqueline Foure de Suze, A.M. 
(Mrs. Carl de Suze) 
Special Instructor in French 

Clare Louise Sweeney, A.B., S.B., Ed.M. 

Assistant Professor of Office Management 
F. Wylie Sypher, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English 
Louisa Nellie Tate, S.B. 

Special Instructor in Institutional Management 

John Arrend Timm, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Director of the School of 
Science, and Chairman of the Dii'ision of Science 

Warren Stenson Tryon, A.M. 
Associate Professor of History 

Frieda Silbert Ullian, Ed.M., Ph.D. 
(Mrs. Hyman B. Ullian) 
Instructor in Economics 

Dino Gris Valz, A.B. 

Special Instructor in Book and Magazine Publish- 
ing 

Susie Augusta Watson. A.B., R.N., S.B. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Elisabeth Laura Whipple, S.M. 
Special Instructor in Nutrition 

Eva Whiting White, S.B. 
(Mrs. W. D. White) 
Professor of Social Economy 

Jennie Blakeney Wilkinson, S.B., Ed.M. 
Associate Professor of Secretarial Studies 

Catherine Jones Witton, A.M. 
(Mrs. Edgar A. Witton) 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

Helen Wood, R.N., A.M. 

Professor of Nursing, and Director of the School of 
Nursing 

Margaret Woodbridge. Ph.D. 

Special Instructor in English 
Frederick Wyatt, Ph.D. 

Special Instructor in Psychology 

"Laurence William Wylie, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

*On leave of absence for civilian reconstruction service 



[29] 




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ISuAtii&iA, 




_£* 




PnJW* 




gckooM' 



> 



i 





2fc* 






• 



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Lab version of Chanel No. 5 
Dr. Timtn at ease with his pipe 
Ruga and Salvo of Ellen Richards 




You can always tell a Science senior 

from a distance. They are the girls who 

run around school in those smocks 

which, as you come closer, reek of a 

mixture of hydrogen sulfide, ether, and 

formaldehyde. Their appearance is 

professional. Their lab coats, while not 

in accordance with Hattie Carnegie's latest, are 

certainly functional. Regardless of whether they 

are majoring in chemistry, biology, or physics, 

they spend all their time in lab. 

However, they haven't always been that way. 
Their feeling at home among test tubes, skeletons, 
and electronic gadgets is the result of three years 
of intensive training in the natural sciences. Al- 
though each student chooses the particular field in 
which she wishes to specialize, a good general 
knowledge in each of the fields is required of all 
girls in the Science school. 

During the first two years the Science student 
gets her introduction to the various fields open to 
her. She has to take math, chemistry, biology, and 
physics. At the end of her sophomore year, having 
had a taste of each of the three branches open to 
her, she decides on her major — chemistry, biology, 
or physics and mathematics. From then on the 
roads divide. It's more physics and math as well as 
chemistry for girls going into chemistry or physics. 
Juniors going into biology have to take anatomy 
and physiology (you've seen their famous cats, 
haven't you?) as well as bacteriology. In her senior 



[32] 




'uddUuf icieniuti invade the. unknotim 



year the biology major takes courses in histology 
and hospital lab methods. And so, after four years 
of hard work, she is ready to work in a hospital 
laboratory, or as research assistant in any of the 
subjects she has studied. 

Seniors majoring in physics and math study 
more calculus, more physics (including atomic 
physics) as well as physical chemistry. They also 
take a laboratory course in which they work on 
special problems. Because of the importance of 
electronics and its allied fields in the war effort, 
physics majors are in great demand today. 

The chemistry majors spend their last year at 
Simmons in the advanced organic chemistry 
laboratory, taking enough time out to attend their 
other classes and to pay a weekly visit to the phy- 
sical chemistry lab. They are also required to take 
another semester of biology. To round out their 
scientific education and to bring them up to date 
on what chemists everywhere are doing, the de- 
partment offers a non-credit seminar, this year on 
recent advances in organic chemistry. 

A graduate course either in chemical laboratory 
techniques or in public health laboratory proce- 
dures including work in the preparation of vac- 
cines and antitoxins is also offered to a limited 
number of qualified graduates. This course leads 
to a diploma. 

Simmons Science Seniors usually spend their 
last semester at school weighing the comparative 
merits of the various positions offered them. They 
don't have to stand in waiting lines. With the 
usual procedure reversed, the prospective em- 
ployer does the soliciting, by letter, personal inter- 
view, and representatives sent to the college. 

After four years in the laboratory, the science 
student has acquired a good deal of poise in her 
work. After all the time she has spent in it, the lab 
has become a second home to her. However, she 
does take time out once in a while for extracur- 
ricular activities. There is, for instance, the Ellen 
Richards Club, the student club of the Science 
School. About half the meetings are devoted to 
scientific topics, the rest are purely social. In the 
fall there are always the initiations of the sopho- 
mores who are just entering the school. Beakers, 
bottles, and test tubes hold the food. In Novem- 
ber, Dr. Mary Willard gave a talk on the polariz- 



ing microscope and its uses in the tracing of cry- 
stals and crime. In February there was a successful 
bridge party. In March the program was turned 
over to several graduates of the Science School 
who came back to tell of the work they are doing. 
The big affair of the year, Ellen Richards' birth- 
day party, was held in April. Ellen Richards, in 
case you don't know, was the first woman chem- 
istry teacher at M.I.T. This party is always a lot 
of fun. Here, like at most of the other meetings 
of the club, is an opportunity for students and 
faculty connected with the school to meet infor- 
mally and really get to know each other. At the 
end of the year there is the annual picnic which for 
the last few years has been held in the backyard of 
the college. With the new open fireplaces the food 
cooked outdoors tasted delicious. 

This year the officers of Ellen Richards were 
Eleanor Rugo, president; Josephine Salvo, secre- 
tary-treasurer; Ursula Walz, senior representa- 
tive; Jean Angelo, junior representative; Phyllis 
Levchuk, sophomore representative; and Kath- 
leen Wiswell, publicity chairman. Miss Harriet A. 
Southgate is faculty advisor of the club. 



Stop! I'm ticklish! 




33 




moAixzCfe* aaakl ^oft eoesiy yield 




Whiz! Clatter! Hold your hat. 
That distracted looking female beat- 
ing a path up the narrow stairs to 
Library A isn't being chased by 
demons; she's just doing her lab 
assignment for D.B. (descriptive 
bibliography — or making catalog cards — to the 
uninitiated). And the bespectacled senior who 
floats around the library clutching a handful of 
small slips of paper (importantly called P-slips), 
and poking her nose into Who's Who, or Ency- 
clopedia of Social Sciences, is really looking up the 
answers to reference questions. Such is the life of a 
Library Science senior! In one short year she 



makes a complete metamorphosis from a wild and 
wooly college girl to a dignified, professional libra- 
rian who can charm the Oshkosh Women's Club 
with a clever discussion of the latest banned book. 

It really isn't a case of arrested development 
when a senior is seen running through the halls 
grasping some brightly colored picture books and 
muttering, "Then the baby bear said, 'Someone 
has been sitting in my chair!'" The girl is merely 
practicing her story-telling, so she will thrill wide- 
eyed little tots with the ever-popular Peter Church- 
mouse, or Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel. 

Though the Library School program may look 
dull in the catalog — courses titled L.S. 1, L.S. 7, 
L.S. 9, and for variety, L.S. 15 — it is really 
very interesting. As well as the above mentioned 
courses, there are courses which deal with the 
library's part in adult education, the history of 
illuminated manuscripts, publishing and book- 
reviewing, and all types of periodicals, pamphlets, 
and materials other than books. These are the 
courses which enable a Library Science graduate 
to work in anything from a bookmobile to an in- 
dustrial laboratory or a military camp library. 






^^m 


II 




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III 


• 

I m 


m 



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^ ^ 

V 



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ojj the Ifutwie 



One of the biggest thrills of the year is spring 
practice work. The School sends its students far 
and wide to get practical experience in all types of 
libraries. Some girls will be working with young 
people in county libraries in Ohio, and others will 
be privileged to work in Veterans' Hospitals' lib- 
raries in New York. Some will be in college lib- 
raries in Maryland, and many in large public 
libraries in several large cities. 

The existence of the embryo librarian is not all 
work and no play. She has 020, otherwise known 
as Zero-twenty, which is the classification number 
for library economy. At its teas the club provides 
opportunity to hear speakers in the field tell of 
their experiences, and the chance for informal 
gatherings among professors and students alike. 
This winter the members dined at the Blue Ship 
Tea Room, and also had a dinner in the late 
spring. Jean Young, President, was assisted by 
Peggy Elliott, Vice-President; Jackie Zeldin, Sec- 
retary; Barbara Gates, Treasurer; and Barbara 
Taylor, Chairman of Social Activities. 




Nina C. Brotherton, 
acting Director of the 
School of Library Science 



From these books trill come her D.B. 
020 officers: Gates, Taylor, Young, Zeldin 
A second home on the third floor 
Abandon hope all ye who enter here 





eUdel efyuu&tixxf, and pxUte, LuAineAA li 




Dr. Samuel Jesse Lukens 
Director of School of Business 

Gregg at any angle 





The Business School girls are the 
"efficiency kids" of Simmons, always 
getting things done, and on time. The 
motto of the school is efficiency, initia- 
tive and judgment. When girls gradu- 
ate from the Business School, they are 
suited to be crack right-hand women. 

When the Business School was founded in 1902, 
one of the original schools of the College, the em- 
phasis was placed on producing effective private 
executive secretaries, medical or legal, as the stu- 
dents desired. Simmons produced secretaries with 
an all-around background, both technical and 
academic. 

As time passed, and women gradually wedged 
their way into other forms of business, more im- 
portance came to be placed on accounting, adver- 
tising, marketing, and personnel. And in 1945 the 
sphere of interest includes Business School stu- 
dents in statistics, labor, and economics. 

The staff and the director of the school have 
planned a well-rounded program: first year, pro- 
gram of academic subjects; second year, introduc- 
tion to shorthand and typing; economics, English, 
and another academic elective; third year, more 
shorthand and typing, accounting, personnel, 
business organization and marketing; fourth year, 
legal or medical shorthand, office machines, com- 
mercial law, secretarial procedures, and two or 
three more business electives in her particular 
field — accounting, statistics or personnel. 

Business School seniors go out on practice work 
to various business firms, department stores, edu- 
cational institutions, airlines, radio stations, or 
any other business organizations in keeping with 
the particular field of specialization of the student. 
Like all other practice work, this is for the purpose 
of indoctrinating seniors into the business world. 
It gives them a chance to get the feel of a business 
office, watch office procedures, and see how every- 
thing works. From this practice work period come 
the makes of secretaries. 



[36] 



tUei/i, buAAH&H 



The Scribunal Club is known to be one of the 
friendliest clubs at Simmons. It also has the largest 
membership of any club. "Scribe" meetings al- 
ways promise fun and draw large crowds of Busi- 
ness School students from their studies to enjoy a 
cup of tea and a chat with one of the professors 
who always turn out en masse. Mr. Lukens, the 
busy director of the Business School, is never too 
busy to come to the meetings. 

Scribunal meetings are arranged so as to include 
subjects of interest to the girls. Mr. Lowell S. 
Trowbridge, of the Psychology Department of 



Boston University, spoke on business girls in war- 
time, and Mr. Edward J. Lynch, President of the 
National Office Managers' Association, gave a 
talk on what a business man expects of a secretary. 
Amusing skits are often presented about secre- 
tarial work, and a Charlie Chaplin movie was 
featured. 

Scribunal officers include: President, Doris 
Carter; Treasurer, Jean Greenhalgh; Program 
Chairman, Erina Burke; Secretary, Alice Driscoll; 
Publicity Chairman, Bernice Diamond, and 
Chairman of Teas, Grace Noren. 



A letter from the record 



Scribunal officers, left to right: Noren, Leighton, 
Driscoll, Carter, Diamond, Greenhalgh, Burke 




[37] 




n&psu& become pAx^eAAJxuuU ta netnxUd 



The Preprofessional School, 
headed by sympathetic Dr. Harri- 
son L. Harley, is the youngest 
school at Simmons. Characterized 
by four different programs, it is 
designed to prepare students for 
graduate study in library science, social work, 
store service education and the different medical 
sciences, such as medicine, dentistry, physio- 
therapy, and occupational therapy. 

During their stay at Simmons, girls in the Pre- 
professional School are constantly counselled to 
decide upon their field and take background 
courses related to that field, although a broad cul- 



tural background is required by the school. Thus, 
a girl heading for the field of social work takes 
courses in history, psychology, economics, and 
sociology, while a girl going to the Prince School 
majors in business, clothing, design, and allied 
subjects. 

Although the entire preprofessional program is 
designed as preparation, it is possible to major in 
such fields as statistics or economics while at 
Simmons, with no further study at a graduate 
school. However, such study can not be as com- 
plete as in some other school, since no definite 
programs have as yet been mapped out for such 
fields at Simmons. 




[38] 



tam&ViauA wdld 



Dr. Harrison L. Harley, guiding 
light of the Prepros 





The programs of the Preprofessional School, 
excluding that one which prepares for medical 
study, lead to graduate study at schools of Sim- 
mons if the students desire to remain here. Sim- 
mons has a graduate school of Library Science, one 
of Social Work at 18 Somerset Street in Boston, 
and the Prince School of Retailing, at 19 Allston 
Street in Boston. Preliminary studies at Simmons 
are designed to carry on to these schools for ad- 
vanced degrees. 

Because the undergraduate program in the 
Preprofessional School is made up largely of 
academic lectures, many students have spare time 
during the week for extra work in social service, in 
department stores, or as volunteer workers in 
hospitals. 



Conference room in session 
Marriage is a family affair 
• Vaughn, Rankin, and Steiger, Int'l experts 
• Prepro's with rings on their fingers 
• Rating their personality 
Go easy on those Soc. exams 

[39] 




wiArt&Uiti, editoXA,, a+uil fuudiiUesil make 



The English Club, as the official spokesman and 
social organ for students in the English school, 
meets monthly, presenting programs of both edu- 
cational and entertainment value for its thirty- 
two members. Book reviews and literary debates 
characterize its meetings. 

Some of the outstanding speakers who were pre- 
sented this year include Miss Judith Matlack, 
Mr. F. Wylie Sypher, and Mr. Ross Lockridge, all 
of the English Department at Simmons, and Mr. 
William Cobb, who is college textbook editor 



of the Houghton Mifflin Publishing Company. 

The Christmas meeting was the big entertain- 
ment feature of the year, with music, fun, frolic, 
and food for all. 

The English Club, as do all other clubs repre- 
senting schools, presented English School gradu- 
ates to freshmen planning to enter this school in 
the College Opportunities program. 

Officers include: President, Patricia Goodnow; 
Vice-President, Charlotte Hickman; Secretary, 
Priscilla Wheelock; Treasurer, Edyth Davenport. 



• Editor's Room. . .Grand Central • No .shortage here 

1! 



Script among the butts 




tUeib woAjJU fi&ijprun 




The English School offers the 
answer to all Simmons girls who 
aspire to editorial, publicity, ad- 
vertising, or journalistic work. As in 
other schools, it is possible to major 
in one of these fields, or to take a 
straight academic course. 

The freshman year is modeled as in other 
schools, specialization beginning in the second 
year, with courses in writing and literature. In 
the junior year, students usually take journalism 
and advertising, and it is at this time that most 
students decide what their major is to be. The 
junior year also is the beginning of the three- 
semester course, English 57, also known as Editing 
and Publishing Techniques, which fits girls for 
positions on magazines, newspapers and in adver- 
tising offices. During the senior year, English 
School students can be seen slaving over their 
publishing projects. 

Dr. Gay, long favorite director of the school, 
who is retiring this June, advises students as to 
their courses, and establishes innumerable con- 
tacts for permanent employment for alumnae. 

Students in the English School are sent out on 
practice work to radio stations, publishing houses 
for both books and magazines, and advertising 
firms. Many seniors take permanent positions in 
the places of their practice work. 

The work of publishing the three college pub- 
lications, News, Fen Ways, and Microcosm is done 
largely by students of the English School. In fact, 
work on one issue of Fen Ways is a requirement of 
the school. Newspaper and yearbook editors have 
consistently come from the school of English, and 
gain invaluable experience from their work since 
they do everything except the actual printing and 
engraving. 

By senior year, the editors' room in the first- 
floor wing is the second home of the English 
School. It is an atmosphere of typewriters, cuts, 
assignments and deadlines, not to mention the 
private and often gruesome-sounding lingo that 
everyone uses at work. 




Dr. Robert Gay, Director of the School 
of English 



English Club officers: Davenport, Hickman, Good- 
now, Wheelock 




[41] 



lotkeA and oaa/u 




A draped shape 

Testing for durability 

Chicken in the rough 

Home Fa- Club officers: Hendrickson, 
Burr, Whittdker, Palmer, Stetson 



[42] 



Cieate 




The girls in the School of Home 
Economics assume responsibility for 
the delicious smells floating around 
the second floor, but more impor- 
tant, they become experts in the 
always vital fields of dietetics, 
clothing, and institutional management. 

Members of the school combine a liberal educa- 
tion with their specialized program, and receive 
basic preparation in the social and physical sci- 
ences. Those with a flair for writing may add 
electives in design, journalism, and advertising, 
if they intend to enter the business field of home 
economics. 

Under their specialized programs, students of 
the school work in settlement houses or nursery 
schools besides spending a great deal of time in the 
textile, food, and science laboratories. They also 
live for eight weeks at Practice House, where they 
take over everything from the cooking and clean- 
ing to the intricate problems of home manage- 
ment. 

Opportunities for graduates of the school are 
numerous, and include the fields of community 
nutrition, hospital dietetics, school and industrial 
cafeteria management, textile research, and teach- 
ing. Especially timely positions may be found in 
Army and Navy Dietetics and in the government- 
sponsored program of nutritional education for the 
American home. An expanded public housing pro- 
gram during the post-war years will also create a 
demand for trained housing administrators and 
project managers. 

The social life of the school is provided by the 
Home Economics Club, whose monthly teas and 
catering jobs not only test the girls' cooking ability 
but also increase the treasury. 

This year the club went international, beginning 
with lectures on the food habits of Panama, Chile, 
and Mexico, and following through with a Chinese 




Dr. Elda Robb 
Director of School 
of Home Economics 



Auction in behalf of the War Fund. Then, of 
course, there was the annual fun of the Christmas 
Party and the Mother-Daughter Tea. In May, the 
club welcomed all prospective Home-Ecers from 
the Freshman class with a dinner. 

Weekly sandwich sales on campus supple- 
mented other activities and so increased the club 
funds that this year it was possible to establish a 
scholarship under which some student may enjoy 
the privilege of eight weeks at Practice House. 

Officers for the year were: President, Louise 
Hendrickson; Vice-President, Martha Brooks; 
Secretary, Lois Burr; Treasurer, Elaine Palmer; 
Programs, Ann Stetson; Publicity, Eunice Little- 
field. 



[43] 





zee jjosi netctilwuf, 



Helen Rich Norton, Associate Director of the 
Prince School of Retailing 



thus giving the graduates the broadest possible 
background. 

The Prince School has a six-week practice period 
before Christmas. All students are assigned to 
full-time positions in Boston stores, and are paid 
regular salaries. In addition, field work is under- 
taken throughout the course in various depart- 
ment and specialty stores, giving the student an 
opportunity to familiarize herself with methods in 
different stores. 




The Prince School of Retailing 
offers two programs : a one-year pro- 
gram planned primarily for college 
graduates, and a four-year under- 
graduate program. The last two 
years of the latter program are 
planned for graduates of junior colleges and stu- 
dents who have completed the first two years of 
senior college work. 

Lnder the direction of Mr. Samuel Jesse Lukens 
and Miss Helen Rich Norton, the school prepares 
students for positions in fields such as personnel 
management, buying, sales and fashion promo- 
tion, research, and office management. Because of 
the war and the shortage of manpower, many 
alumnae of Prince now serve in stores doing price- 
control work and in administrative positions in the 
Office of Price Administration. 

To keep the courses of Prince lined up with the 
ever-changing developments, the curriculum is 
being constantly revised. Much attention is now 
being given to governmental war regulations and 
their effects on retailing, and on consumer inter- 
ests, labor relations in a war economy, the utiliza- 
tion of available manpower, planning for postwar 
retailing, and the contributions of distributive 
education to wartime training in retailing. 

For effective leadership in retailing, a well- 
rounded conception of the interrelation of store 
functions is essential. To this end basic instruction 
is given in the functions and procedures of man- 
agement, merchandising, publicity, and control, 

• A word to prospective buyers 

• Fashion is fan 




Social WonJi jjOb welfare 



Katherine Hardvrick, Director of the School of 
Social Work 



Up on Beacon Hill in 1904, the 
Simmons College School of Social 
Work came into existence, the first 
school in the country for the full- 
time education of social workers. 
Open only to college graduates, it is 
now filling the enormous demand for social work- 
ers created by the war. 

Under the guidance of tall, gray-haired, charm- 
ing Miss Katherine Hardwick, students choose one 






of five general fields of study: family welfare, med- 
ical or psychiatric social work, juvenile aid, com- 
munity organization, or social research. Students 
have already been initiated into these fields in 
undergraduate study long before they come to 
social work. 

The entire program, which leads to the degree 
of Master of Science, is based on the case work 
theory, and a great deal of time is spent in either 
family, children's, or neighborhood agencies, giv- 
ing the students a chance to understand the phil- 
osophy of social work, besides practical experience. 

This practical work characterizes the first year 
of study, while the second year is devoted to 
specialized study in the field of the student's 
choice. 

Volunteer work in war agencies, settlement 
houses, and hospitals, plays a large part in the 
lives of social workers. Their experience is being 
constantly broadened with daily personal con- 
tacts and meetings. 

The school has weathered two wars and one 
national economic depression. It has seen the 
social workers increase from a handful of social 
butterflies, playing Lady Bountiful, to scores of 
conscientious individuals who are planning to 
make their living in social work. 

It is only recently that the social worker has 
received the respect and the salary that she de- 
serves. This war has opened up many new fields to 
the social worker, and has made her essential in 
older fields where she has heretofore been only a 
decoration. 

• Off to practice work 

• . . . that's a social problem! 




tude+tt Qo4J&wiment ccondtnatel 4tua&nt 



Student Government has had an active year. 
An effort has been made to make the gap be- 
tween the commuters and the dormitory students 
a smaller one. Box suppers were provided for 
commuters in the fall to make step-singing more 
fun. Olde English Dinner, one of Simmons out- 
standing traditions, was opened to Senior Com- 
muters, through the voting of the Sophomores to 
have it a Junior-Senior affair. 

Through suggestions that came from the Beef 
Box, the Council took action upon various mat- 
ters. An extension of the Christmas vacation was 
made possible by a letter written to President 
Beatley. This year, the Student Officer's room 
was redecorated, re-arranged, and generally 
straightened up. Student Government Bib Party 
was revived this year, and a new Junior Tradition, 
a Jamboree, was started to take the place of 
Freshman-Junior Wedding. Student Government 
constitution was revised. 

Student Government is an active force at Sim- 
mons, and it is a "student" government in name 



and fact. It plays an important part in the lives 
of everyone at Simmons. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

A ssista n t V ice- P res id en t 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Assistant Treasurer 



Joan Melber 
Mary Grube 
Ann Ross 
Martha Brooks 
Phyllis Bernau 
Jean Begley 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL 

Lucille Lundy Charlotte Hickman 

Doris Jackson Prudence Speirs 

Priscilla Hanna Martha Drake 

HONOR BOARD 

Chairman, Janet Hyde 
Erina Burke Margaret West 

Barbara Chapin Ann Michelson 

Betsey Foley Dorothy Longley 

Lois Burr Rachel Davis 




Madame President. . .Joan Melber 



[50] 




Student Government Council in session 



[51] 




SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 

Chairman, Jane Reynolds 

Constance Ramsdell Phyllis Noren 

Grace Noren Mary Sylvano 

Martha Riley Barbara Marks 

Jean Stocks 



DORMITORY COUNCIL 



Chairman, 

Nancy Baker 
Caryl Key 
Martha Hanushek 
Gladys Blum 
Jane Mulvey 
Mary Box 
Martha Bears Rich 
Barbara Gates 
Carolyn Chase 
Mary Clark 



Mary Grube 

Sallie Grinnell Birnie 
Mary Johnston 
Barbara Powers 
Hilda Mehring 
Barbara Cochrane 
Betty Grant 
Helen Fallon 
Charlotte McKorkindale 
Marjorie Garland 
Eleanor Johnson 



Student Officers room gets- a banner 

Inter-Club Council officers: Carter, Rich, Burdick 

Honor Board poses 




[52] 



iiudetit body, and n,&fuldt&i 



DORMITORY BOARD 

Nancy Baker Barbara Gates 

Sallie Grinnell Birnie Barbara Powers 

Martha Hanushek Mary Clark 
Betty Grant 



OTHER COLLEGE OFFICERS 



College Voucher 
Fire Chief 
Assistant Fire Chief 
College Song Leader 



Jane Curt in 
Barbara Chapin 
Marie Welch 
Barbara Taylor 



ASSEMBLY SUGGESTION COMMITTEE 

Chairman, Ann Knott 

Alice Whittaker Doris Drescher 

Barbara Bradley Ann Kirkland 

Shirley Lindgren Margaret Wood 

Dorothy Longley 




Treasurer Bernau goes over the books 



Dorm Board in session 




[53] 




When the B'nai Brith Hillel Foundation came 
to Boston last year, Simmons College was among 
the first to welcome it. We, at Simmons, changed 
the club for Jewish students from Menorah to 
Hillel. 

Hillel provides an adequate means for these 
students to obtain an understanding of Jewish 
values and to experience special moments of iden- 
tity with Jewish tradition. The areas of service 
include the cultural, the social, and the religious. 

Our activities this year included the program, 
study, the social, interfaith, Zionist, and news- 
paper. Students feel free to use the facilities of the 
Hillel offices, which include a library, conference 
rooms, a kitchen, and a lounge for our socials. 

In the two years the Hillel Foundations has 
been in Boston, it has extended its services to 
Harvard, Radcliffe, M.I.T., Simmons and many 
others. 

Hillel officers are: President, Jean Cohen; Vice- 
President, Ruth Rudik; Secretary, Selma Brick, 
and Treasurer, Natalie Kotzen. 



eJjXjtaui, ciuipi 



The Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship is one of 
many such chapters in colleges all over the United 
States. A comparatively new organization, which 
is interdenominational and fundamentalist, the 
Simmons chapter was formed last year when the 
Unity Club and the League of Evangelical Stu- 
dents merged. This year, the club continued its 
monthly meetings at the Parker House, along with 
other Boston I.V.C. members, where they heard 
a series of interesting and informative talks by 
prominent lecturers. 

Other activities included daily devotional meet- 
ings and a Bible Study discussion of problems 
confronting college students. One of the speakers 
at a monthly meeting was Miss Willie Harris, 
R.N., a graduate student at Simmons. Highlights 
of the year included a Christmas banquet and a 
spring weekend conference with students of other 
colleges. 

Officers of I.V.C.F. were: President, Althea 
Hanson; Secretary-Treasurer, Leah Stetson, and 
Publicity Chairman, Alma Johnson. 



Hillel officers: Gordon, Rudik, Cohen, Kotzen, Brick 



I.V.C.F. officers: Johnson, Hanson, Stetson 




[54] 



f^ixuude jjellcHipUtlp, jpk ev&uf, jjCutU 




Christian Science officers: Michelson, Young, Newman Club officers: Heiler, Murphy, McDonough 
Littlefield, Forrester Wood 



The Christian Science organization began the 
year with a tea to welcome new Freshman mem- 
bers and to explain the purpose of the club. Regu- 
lar bi-monthly meetings were then resumed, for 
which the reader prepared selections from the 
Bible and Science and Health with Key to the Scrip- 
tures, by Mary Baker Eddy. 

The annual lecture was given on April 16 by 
Mr. Richard J. Davis, a member of the Board of 
Lectureship of the Mother Church, First Church 
of Christ, Scientist, in Boston. Club members, the 
faculty, and their guests attended the lecture, 
which was under the supervision of Eunice Little- 
field, the lecture committee chairman. The organ- 
ization also received invitations from other Chris- 
tian Science groups to attend open meetings and 
lectures at Harvard, M.I.T., Radcliffe, and Wel- 
lesley. 

Club officers for the year were: Chairman, Ann 
Michelson; Vice-Chairman, Dort Forrester; Sec- 
retary, Mary Ebersole; Treasurer, Elsie Little- 
field; Reader, Jean Young. 



Newman Club offers Catholic students an op- 
portunity for Catholic culture and fellowship, and 
gives them an opportunity to know one another. 
The club offers a three-point program of spiritual, 
intellectual, and social activities. 

This year, in addition to the M. I. T. -Simmons 
Communion Breakfast, the club helped sponsor a 
Communion Mass and reception to Archbishop 
Richard J. Cushing in cooperation with Catholic 
students of Greater Boston. 

An exhibition of Catholic literature was given, 
and a theatre party to "Pilate's Daughter" was 
enjoyed. 

The informal Newman Dance was the import- 
ant social function of the year, and the activity 
program reached a climax at the Mother and 
Daughter Communion Breakfast which took place 
in May. 

Newman Club's board of officers includes: 
President, Marie Murphy; Vice-President, Marie 
Heller; Secretary, Margaret Wood, and Treasurer, 
Ann McCaffery. 



[55] 







*M{iUa6AA44fXj, the muliccu G . . . and Ute 




Bluettes at work: Murley, Ames, West, Morrison, 
Crowe, Warren 



The Musical Association really took to the road 
this year, giving several joint concerts in addition 
to their regular Simmons program. The Glee Club 
started off with a Christmas Vesper Service at St. 
Paul's Church in Brookline, at which President 
Beatley read the scripture. In February, members 
of the club gave a joint concert at Brown Univer- 
sity and had such a wonderful time that they're 
already looking for a return engagement next year. 

Later in the winter, the Glee Club sang at the 
evening service of the First Baptist Church in 
Haverhill, and followed this with a musical as- 
sembly in which the orchestra and the Bluettes 
also participated. 

In May, the club spent a day in Exeter, New 
Hampshire, singing at the Unitarian Church in the 
morning and attending a large youth rally in the 
afternoon. The year wound up with a joint concert 
at Worcester Tech, and, of course, the choir sing- 
ing at commencement. 



A Capella choir has a song in the air 



Glee Club officers: Top: Wood, Seim, Colvin, Ames 
Bottom: Dockler, Hanson, Sjostrom 




[56] 



academic A 



The Bluettes form a special section of the asso- 
ciation, and for two years, no Simmons event has 
been complete without them. The present mem- 
bers of the sextet are: Margaret West, Elizabeth 
Warren, Dorothy Murley, Janice Ames, Alice 
Morrison, and Barbara Seim. Another select group 
is the A Capella, a group of sixteen Glee Club 
members who are featured in concerts. 

Club officers for the year were : President, Betty 
Sjostrom; Secretary, Elizabeth Warren; Treas- 
urer, Jean Wood; Business Manager, Eunice 
Howard; Concert Manager, Janice Ames; Li- 
brarians, Barbara Seim and Miriam Colvin. 



Academy is the honor organization of Simmons, 
designed to recognize scholastic achievement by 
students. Until last year, Academy received no 
faculty recognition, but at present it has a board 
of faculty advisors who act as councillors. Acad- 
emy is Simmons' own Phi Beta Kappa, because 
requirements for membership are the same as 
those of the national society. A 3.2 average in 
studies is necessary for two years before a student 
gains admission, although seniors may be ad- 
mitted at graduation. 

The annual Academy formal reception was held 
early in November to introduce new members to 
senior members and faculty guests. Dr. Edith F. 
Helman spoke on "Many Argentinas, " and re- 
freshments were served. 

Academy endeavors each year to hold a joint 
meeting with another club. This year it was held 
in cooperation with the Preprofessional School. 
Dr. Kumarappa, of Bombay, India, gave an en- 
lightening talk. Each spring Academy also gives a 
theatre party preceded by dinner, which is en- 
joyed by all. 

Academy officers include: President, Yolanda 
Romanelli; Secretary, Hazel Eaton; Treasurer, 
Virginia Greenwood; Junior Representative, 
Gladys Blum, and Activities Chairman, Camille 
Prescott. 

Entering freshmen, during the week that the 
seniors wear their caps and gowns, first see the 
Academy "blue and gold" and make it their goal. 




Academy officers: Eaton, Greenwood, Romanelli 
Academy receives faculty guests and new members 




[57] 




f *iUed StcUel Student Anemldtf, and 




USSA officers: Brick, Davidqff, Samuda, 
Lehrman, Perlman 

"One of my days" 




158] 



Wan* £>el<uce Gammittee camfuiixfn 



U.S.S.A. views the passing of the senior class 
with mixed regret and anticipation, regret because 
many of its most active and faithful workers are 
among those graduating. The seniors have de- 
veloped a mature awareness of the problems of our 
society, and a desire to "do something about it." 
At the same time, we look forward to our seniors 
going into the world as more responsible citizens, 
carrying with them their enthusiasm for accom- 
plishing something really important. 

U.S.S.A. is the "baby" of organizations at 
Simmons. Its founders are among the senior class. 
They have shared in its defeats and glories. They 
laughed at the faux pas of the M.I.T. debating 
team, they profited with the rest by its "Know 
Your Allies" series. And the triumph was the 
presentation of Mrs. Roosevelt who spoke on the 
returning veteran. 

U.S.S.A. presents a challenge to the seniors to 
carry on the fine work which they have started 
here at Simmons in the world outside, and bids 
fair to carry on successfully with the work at 
school. 



The War Service Committee has a very serious 
and distinguished-sounding name. Its business is 
just as serious as the name would lead one to 
think. 

The War Service Committee was created just 
before Pearl Harbor, with the intention of giving 
the students of Simmons a chance to prove their 
patriotism. At present, most of the war work orig- 
inally done by the War Service Committee has 
been taken over by the various clubs as a volun- 
tary contribution. 

Each club has its day at rolling bandages in the 
Council Room, and performing other duties in and 
around school. 

At present, the main work of the War Service 
Committee is the sale of war bonds and stamps. 
The war stamp table under the Service Flag has 
become as much a part of the front hall of Sim- 
mons as the information booth. 

Stamps are sold there every hour of the day. A 
very successful war bond drive was carried on at 
Simmons at the time of the Sixth War Loan Drive, 
and another on campus in April. 



War Service Committee co-chairmen. 
Madden and Kingston 



Mr. Morgenthau's delight 




[59] 




li r anxit Uui r o*U! — inten^uitixuixU 



Come join the Conga line! 

That's what the 45 members of the Pan Ameri- 
can society did this year. And not only the Conga, 
but the Samba and the Tango, and Latin Ameri- 
can songs. 

When President Jean McConnell left to study 
at the University of Mexico at the beginning of 
the year, Pauline Hill was elected president, and 
Natalie Brackman, vice-president. Money and 
minutes were handled by Marilyn Zucker, and 
food, from cookies to mate, by Elizabeth Phelan. 
At mid-years, when publicity chairman Jeanne 
Clarke graduated, Katrine Sorensen took over 
the job of putting Pan American on the map. 

The social affair of the season was the Washing- 
ton's Birthday dance held on February 23 in the 
Evans Hall Game Room from 8 to 12. Silhouettes 
of Washington, bright red cherries, and hatchets 
were the background for dancing Latins from 
MIT and Harvard. 

Pan-American officers: Zucker, Hill, Clarke 




In order to gain an understanding of the broad 
modern French picture, Le Cercle Francais this 
year has tried to present programs covering artis- 
tic, political, and traditional aspects of French 
life. 

At the first open meeting, three sound films 
entitled "The Next Time I See Paris, " " Corsica, " 
and "The Marquis," were shown. Mr. Howard 
Barton, an architect, told members about the 
damage done during the war to famous French and 
Belgian landmarks such as cathedrals, monuments, 
and palaces. 

The Christmas meeting was a traditional old 
French party, with carols, games, French pastries 
and punch, and candy. M. Rene de Messiere an- 
nalyzed the part that France's possessions have 
played in the war, and answered questions about 
French politics. 

Another important French film arrived in the 
United States, and the club was very fortunate to 
be able to show "The Liberation of Paris," nar- 
rated by Charles Boyer. At the last open meeting, 
M. DeSieris Robert Wiener spoke about France, 
today and tomorrow, an analysis of France's posi- 
tion now, and what it will be in the peace. 

Several members of Le Cercle Francais have 
joined the Boston branch of France Forever, an 
organization that publishes information about 
France and sponsors projects for French Relief. 
Membership in this organization entitles girls to 
attend the programs and to receive current French 
publications. 

Since French factories have not been manufac- 
turing civilian clothing for more than four years, 
the club decided to collect food and clothing to 
send to a family acquainted with Miss Bowler, 
faculty advisor of the club. Only small packages 
could be sent, so careful planning was necessary 
to send everything correctly. This drive proved 
a great success. 

This year's officers of Le Cercle Francais in- 
clude: President, Cynthia Tucker; Vice-President, 
Lucille Lundy; Secretary, Cathryn Rudd; Treas- 
urer, Eleanor Demirjian, and Chairman of Teas, 
Lucille Lundy. 



[60] 



jjlao&i 




French Club officers: Demirjian, Lunch/, Rudd, 
Tucker 

Just a Latin from Manhattan 




[61] 




Dramatic Club officers: Gates, Burdick, Boyar 



Juniors win competitives: Back row: Silverman, 

Johnston 
Seated: Riidik, Olfson, Lipson 



ada abo-Ut 



[62] 



AXMneihinxj, — 04, ^Ute fUcupi tk& UtiaXf, 



rr 



The grease paint gals really put on a show this 
year! Dramatic Club members decided to produce 
more and better plays, and were off with a flourish 
in the November Competitives. A record crowd 
of six hundred gathered in the Boys' Latin School 
Auditorium to see Miss Matlack hand the winning- 
cup to the Juniors for their presentation of White 
Queen, Red Queen, directed by Dorothy Burdick. 
Leading players were Sylvia Olfson, Ruth Rudik, 
and Selma Brick. 

At Christmas time, the club broke two prece- 
dents. Instead of the usual pageant, a play en- 
titled God Comes to the World was enacted during 
the assembly period. Then came the really revolu- 
tionary step ! Rather than choose the most beauti- 
ful senior for the madonna, club members gave 
Grace Beshar the role because she looked like 
pictures of the Virgin Mary. This performance 
was directed by Norma Berman, assisted by 
Estelle Lipson, Betty Silverman, and Pat Do- 
herty. 



On February 17, the club made up a theater 
party and saw George Sheridan's School for Scan- 
dal, presented by the Tributary Theater of 
Boston. 

With the spring came another innovation. After 
an absence of three years, the "Spring Produc- 
tion" was added to the calendar of events. The 
play chosen was a melodrama called Spider Island, 
and it was directed by Harlan Grant of the Boston 
Conservatory of Music. A single performance was 
given on May 11 at the Boys' Latin School Audi- 
torium. Members of the cast were: Pat Doherty, 
Edyth Ehlers, Edith Davenport, Anne Robinson, 
Teddy Santoro, and Connie Stampler. 

The policies of the Dramatic Club this year 
were ambitious and stimulating, and much of the 
credit for their success goes to a hard-working 
group of officers. These were: President, Dorothy 
Burdick; Vice-President, Marial Boyar; Secretary, 
Lisa Rubin; Treasurer, Joan Birnie; Activities 
Chairman, Barbara Gates. 



Rehearsing the axe scene in "Spider Island" 




[63] 




[64] 




we, 



litem tUote aude Ofue^t iftxicel! 



There's nothing unusual about an Outing Club- 
ber as far as appearance around the college is 
concerned, but give her a snow-covered mountain, 
a narrow rocky footpath through the Blue Hills, 
a river, or a good roomy square dance hall and 
watch the difference! 

Within the building, activity centers around the 
bulletin board, where news of coining trips and 
past activities vie with each other for attention. 
The Outing Club News, published weekly by the 
M.I.T. Club, keeps us posted on plans made by 
the Boston Council, of which Simmons, Rad- 
cliffe, Wellesley, Sargent, M.I.T. , Harvard, and 
Tufts are members. The inevitable lack of interest 
in indoor meetings does not worry the Outing 
Club, for the sign-up sheets for trips are not neg- 
lected, whether they are for biking, hiking, rock 
climbing, or skiing. 

The sign-up sheet, as well as the dance floor, 
overflows when it comes to the monthly square 
dances at Memorial Hall, Harvard. Especially 



Outing Club officers: Ranks, Duffy, Eaton 





Climbing the rocks at Manchester 



popular are the week-end excursions to the Tech 
Cabin near the New Hampshire border, even 
when the pipes are frozen and we have to boil 
water taken from a hole in the ice of the lake. 

As a member of the Intercollegiate Outing Club 
Association, the Simmons College Outing Club 
participates in such intercollegiate affairs as Col- 
lege Week and Spring Conference, where ideas are 
swapped and a general good time is had. 

President Hazel Eaton retired from office in 
February, when the term of office expired, and at 
the midwinter election new officers were elected as 
follows: President, Dorothy Weinz; Trips Direc- 
tor, Muriel Duffy; Secretary-Treasurer, Barbara 
Wiley; Meetings Chairman, Ethel Baldwin. Mrs. 
Josephine M. Chapman, of the Physical Education 
Department continues as faculty advisor of the 
club. 



[ 65 




*MGA memhefci one tecufhf yM, leA4uce. 



Members of the YWCA really went all-out for 
the war effort this year. In addition to relief ac- 
tivities, they carried on a broad discussion pro- 
gram and even found time for a little social life on 
the side. 

Following the Freshman acquaintance dance in 
September, the " Y" devoted its first meeting to a 
panel, "Sisters Under the Skin." Participants 
were Joyce Alexander, Carol Ishimoto, Maude 
Morris, Olga Ramirez, and Barbara Vanderhoop. 
In November, the club held an observance of In- 
ternational Student Day and set up a hall table 
for book donors and French Relief workers — the 
latter in cooperation with U.S.S.A. and Hillel. 

When the Thanksgiving season rolled around, 
club members made favors for disabled veterans 
and also held Open House for servicemen at the 
Boston YWCA. In December, there was a Sim- 
mons-Tech dance at the "Y", plus a drive to pur- 
chase a Vic for the veterans in the Waltham Gen- 
eral Hospital. At the December meeting, Miss 



Janet Van Allen spoke on the work of the Ameri- 
can Friends Service in summer camps. 

In January, the club heard a discussion on 
"Dating and Mating in Wartime" by Dr. Thelma 
Alper, psychology instructor at Radcliffe. The 
"Y" followed this by sponsoring an assembly at 
which Mrs. Paul Robeson spoke on "The Negro in 
the Pattern of World Affairs." In March, there 
was another panel, "Anti-Semitism as Manifested 
on Campus," with Mr. Palmer as mediator. Stu- 
dent participants were Sylvia Perlman, Selma 
Geller, Nancy Worth, and Jan Blanchard. The 
April meeting was concerned with international 
entertainment, and in this same month, the "Y' 
became active in the World Student Service Fund 
Drive. The club also formed a Student Public 
Affairs group, which worked with the U.S.S.A. on 
a survey of employment and incomes in the Rox- 
bury area for the Urban League of this state. 

Club officers for the year were: President, Trudi 
Takayama; Vice-President, Mimi Colvin; Secre- 



Poster Committee officers: Lane, Livingstone 



YWCA officers: Congdon, Takayama, Patten 




66] 



Po&tesi G<Mfwuttee fUdti ideal ac/ioM 



tary, Doris Patten; Treasurer, Virginia Congdon. 

The Poster Committee gals are responsible for 
those colorful displays we all find so cheering in 
the school corridors. They are also an aid to those 
harassed editors and dance-promotors who feel the 
need of a little publicity. By using a splash of paint 
and some hand lettering, these girls let us in on the 
coming attractions of our college life. 

The danger of mere clutter in the halls is elimin- 
ated by the watch dogs of the committee, since all 
poster material must be checked by the chairman 
before it ever sees a thumb tack. The year winds 
up with an annual contest, in which prizes are 
awarded to the girls who designed the most at- 
tractive posters. 

Although the committee holds very few meet- 
ings, members have the fun of experimenting with 
new ideas in advertising display and also make a 
little cash on the side. Each girl receives a dollar 
for every poster she designs, which makes the 



whole project very much worth the hard work that 
goes into it. Committee officers for the year were: 
President, Audrey Livingstone; Secretary -Treas- 
urer, June Lane. 




Luncheon with Mrs. Robeson 




[67] 




Editor-in-Chief Irene Saint 



News staff in conference 





C&JUf,, COfllf,, 



" News scoops Boston papers " —and 1300 Sallies 
dash for Info on eighth hour, Thursday, to get a 
copy. 

From the President's office, the butt room, 
Stu-G and the back steps, News reporters gather 
the official and unofficial story of what Simmons 
has done during the week. The four-page sheet 
serves as a forecaster of things to come, and keeps 
the students at Prince, the School of Social Work 
and nurses scattered throughout the city posted 
about doings on main campus. 

"Sally Simmons Says" is number one on reader 
polls, with Social News as runner-up. Student 
opinion is reflected through the Editorial Page, 
and Faculty News makes the paper all-college. 
Columns that never fail to draw the reader's eye 
are "Pro-Con," "Profiles," and of course, "Mar- 
riages and Engagements." 

Students do the news writing, make up the 
paper, and form policies without faculty censor- 
ship. The Editors' Room on Tuesday and Wednes- 
day is in a constant bedlam. Reporters scurry in 
with scribbled copy, fight for typewriters, dash off 
copy, and then dash for class. Editor Saint's usual 
grin becomes a bit grim when white space appears 
in the dummy that shouldn't be white at all. The 
door constantly opens and closes, more people 
pour in clutching their precious bit of news, and 
the resulting noise of clanging typewriters, shuffl- 
ing feet, cries of both despair and frantic joy, and 
people in a general state of confusion is enough to 
drive the sanest of us a little berserk. But no mat- 
ter what might have happened on Tuesday and 
Wednesday, News comes out on Thursday. To 
those on the staff, it is a constant miracle. 

From a two-page mimeographed sheet, News 
has grown to a professional-looking newspaper. 
Way back when, "The Dump" was the column in 
News that caught all the smart (and not-so-smart) 
sayings of students and faculty. Columns were as 
narrow as Back Bay streets. News today is one of 
the better college newspapers. 

This year the paper came of age, and a 21st 
Birthday Ball at the Statler celebrated the occa- 
sion. A huge birthday cake, a Conga line, and a 
door prize made an evening for all to remember. 



(58 ] 



cofuf,, oofuf, CQA24L "*****&*' N&10& 






MIC 



The Simmons News 



COLUMBUS DAY 



VOL. XXII 



SIMMONS COLLEGE, BOSTON, MASS., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5, WVt 



No. 2 



Eleanor Roosevelt Speaks Oct. 27 




Fall Step Singing 
Starts This Week 

01 .'in the old Simmons tractions, 
giog >s one of the plea^antest. 
The foil program begad In^t eight en 
the Coloanftde with the upper classes 
weli omlng the En somen Barbara 
Taylor led the glaglas 

Stepstngtng b .. wi ski) event on 
campus En the i or ng and Est] Uo 
der the glov. of lantern lighti tin i c 
tore i»< Ed tii.: phw i ol homu on the 



The Colonnade 



GLORIA LANDSMAN IS 
NEW FEN WAYS EDITOR 



Gloria Landsman feature editoi Of 
News, 'ahs elected editor-in < hiet of 
the next Issue of Pen Ways at a meet- 
ing of English school seniors on Thurs- 
day, September 28, 

Other members r?t the staff tu< lode: 
Naomi Scott, associate editor Mary 
Mahoney and Wary Wbah-ti. feature 
editors; Miriam 3on.ee and Shirley 
Kreidman, technical editors; SaHi 
Grinnell. art editor; Gertrude Gold 
man. advertising editor; Helen Am- 
brose 1'oskus ami Barbara Cbesly., 
' ■■■ Ugen M'\- 
. i \ - circulation. 

Although Fen Ways is edited by 
BugUsb school Juniors nod seniors, 
poems, stories and articles are eon- 
trtbated by students from all schools 
and classes. Freshmen are especially 
urged to contribute material. 

Contribution- should hi left En the 
Ven Ways' bo\ at Info Of posted to 
one "f the editors 

The firs! issue of Feu Ways will 
come oat around December 1, Dead- 
line for contribution! Mil in Novem- 
ber 8. 



Hold 


Compet 


itives 


Nov. 


17 This 


Year 


TryottI 


for 


competW 


V6S will he 


hcid (Ms 


week: 


ind nest. 


Dorothy Bur* 


ill.Ii. Ilia 


[man 


Of the I' 


niMlic dub. 


' :: £l;: 


(J Eli t 

eruay 


if first m 


etlng of me 
(rotors soph- 


March, « 


HI be 


held this 


year on NOV- 


! ember 17 


Tin 


junior e 


asa will pre- 






ft! EfefeS S 


KSSO, swIM a 


by T ]'. 


Morrl 


end din 


• ti'it by rjox 


give The 


Make 


of the L 


iwa, by lone 


Ward \u 
' re* tor i 
freshmen 


■IV, R 

e cue 


th Marfa! 
ee Hand 


'j" 1 '^ ''"',' 


1 Bea by r 
Compe 


oel C< 


word. 




ter social 
8 , n ted ti 


decld 


which e 


year, hi pre 
tss has most 


i dramatic 


talent 


The pla 


rs me judged 


Ion the ha 


c ;is of 


actios, voire, interpre 




d a- t 


2<rs 


g. stage ef- 



At next week's stepsingii 
n. the program will consia 



ills 



tin y win answei I .< li ■•> u i < msa at 
this stepsmgtng this yeai 

If you aren't sun »1 the words, to all 
Simmons gouge, d^ at youi Freshmen 
Bible Commuter* as well as dorm 
Ktudents are Invited to come 



President's Wife is to be 
Guest of USSA at Assembly 

Eleanor Rooscveh will come to Boston October 11 to speak to 
Siaxmons students at th- regular Assembly program She will in- 
augurate a series of talks sponsored bj the United States Student 
Assembh on the returning servicemen, 

Mrs, Roosevelt will use the information she ha* gathered in her 
visits to lighting Erontsthroughoui th< world to discuss the problem 
of integrating the returning serviceman into civilian life, She has 
talked to servicemen of all nations at homg and abroad, and knows 
what they want when they return. 
_. ___. $ \ L , ]u , pgg^ convention in New 

Sophomores Hear 
President Beatley 



SENIORS! Watch the senior bul- 
letin board Thursday and Friday 
for appointment schedule with pho- 
tographer, Senior pictures will be 
taken between October 9 and No- 
vember 18. Please make your ap- 
pointment as soft as possible, 



sed her interest in the work of 
s mmoBs chapter and promised 
■ i - Lewis, laal year's USSA 
dent, thai she would speal here 

'it- fall if tii.no permitted. Lolfi 

ada, present C!9SA presideut, re- 
id today that Mrs Roosevelt has 
Iwrtaul a wai fob than "a peace Job/' ) *•«»»"»»» promised to some on the 

The nresidenl discussed and com- j " " 
pared the education which Army ftu- 1 AVfter the Srth hour Assembly period, 
thorities are planning for returning | Mr*. Roosevelt will be, the gnest of 



Qeatle 



imual tr; 
Prtda 



job 



S to th* 
ptambei 



men with thi pi i»«i-am which 

jsimmon* College offers. Both aim to 
prepare citizens who will not. only be 
able to earn their livelihood, hut. also 
he able to parttetpatt actively in so 



Microcosm Payments 
Begin on October 10 



scrlptfonB. 

Personalised eoptia or Mic will ■ 
seven dollars and irty eenta, If i 



Inter-Club Council Plans 
Get' Acquainted Dances 



Two get-at:(jiiaint«d dunce; 
freshmen and sophomoree, early in 
Decreniocr. anil one for juniors and sen- 
iors, aoraettiue in January— ;m being 
planned by the later-Club Council, 
which bad Us Aral meeting mat Thurs- 
day, September 21. 

Dorothy Buruiek in charge of the 
dances, said they will he Informal ami 

will be held in some Boston hotel. Her 

committee will try to provide men. 

The Council is also planning to set 
up a calendar of events for the year, 
and post each month's program on the 
Bret of the month, beginning with N'ov- 
emher, on a bulletin board on the first 
floor. 

Beginning at the end of this mouth, 
each club will be In charge of bandage- 
rolling for one week, and competition 
will be held for representation of the 
greatest percentage of club member- 
ships, a prize going to the winner. 

A show is planned in the spring for 
the entire coUege. with all clubs par- 
ticipating 

The object of the Inter-Club Coun- 
cil, which Is functioning for the llrst 
time this year, Is to bring the clubs 
closer together and to get the students 
more interested in the various clubs, 
Nancy Rich, chairman of the Council, 
said. The president of the senior cla*s 
Is chairman of the Council, which has 
as its members the chairman of Social 
Activities. aU class presidents and the 
presidents of all the clubs. Dorothy 
(Continued on Page 3) 



WSC Urges Girls 
Save Waste Paper 
To Aid Scrop Drive 



little hit rad ■ 
Asatson A cm 
1 1 uiea on Simmons traditions 
news ami everyday tfrlng will !■■ -■ 

to the ui-ual contents The emphasis 
i- to be on picture? rather than on 
jcopy, anil a new casual 
maintained throughout, 



ial 
idoVd 



Fill be 



Plan 



to 



;iMM>;n* 



i too* [01 



students to save paper and aid the 
scrap-panel drive were discussed ol 
the first meeting of the War Service 
Committee held in the Student Officers 
room at 4:it» on Tuesday, October 3 
Frances Madden, co-chairman, »u 
nounced today 

War stamps w Itl soon be sold at 
ball table ami in the luueh room and 
plans aii being formulated for Sim* 
moos 1 contribution to the coming War 

Fund Drive, 

The committee will have charge ol 
recruiting blood donors for the Mood 
bank in Boston All donors must be 
eighteen years of a?p or ovoi . and 
have their parents' .written consent if 
they are under twenty-one 

Tentative plans have been made to 
conduct u group of volunteers to tail 
for war rebel Volunteers wu") ;ti^t> !"■ 
asked to help relieve the acute short 
age of workers in several Boston hos- 
pitals. 

Prances Madden and Lucille King 
Eton are co-chairmen of the lomtnit- 
tee composed of the following stu- 
dentfl Ruth Becker and Prisciila Hen- 
na '■16; and Ruth Ann Brown and Mary 
Barrett '47. 






pi 



clan. 



tin 




staff 

freshman and sophomore classes Miss 

Mtttnmi said, as experienced arorkerB 

will be needed for Future Isfmos of M!e, 

While staff members will not he re- 
cruited tor at [east another month. 
the editorial board Cor tM6 was elect- 



Michael Microcosm 
Mic Mascot 



ed by 
Woihli 



alumni 



etlrini 



but- 



.oh 



rd las' June 
eater Matsoi 

1, Mary VPhaJ 

Bdell ujabe 
tanftgei Ant 
tansJEer: Bar 



nice Diamond, photographic cditoi 

and Kleanor Demirjian, art editor. Th 
post of circulation manager, former] 
held by Harriet Leighton, Is now fille 
by Jean Greenbalgh 

Evans Hall Teas 
Begin Today 

Commuters and dorm students ace 
invited to an informal tea today at 
3: no in Evans Hall gume room. 

The first of the season this tea wiil 
initiate the regular student teas held 
every other Thursday at Evan- Hal! 

Jane Reynolds Is chairman. 



Anne Strong Club 
To Meet October 10 

S Keu members of Anne Strong ore 
Invited to a meeting of the club Tues 
day, October 10. at 7:45 us Evans Hall 

! Refreshments win be served o.v Jan- 
tee Meyer ami am cornmittee. 
Officers ol the club are: Eunice How 

aid. president; Pomona ! 

'. tl i Elisabeth Garratt sec- 
■ ,.■ Dorothy Blair treasurer 



Rev Virgil Gerber 
To Speok at IVCF 

| Freshmen will be special guestfi at. 
the Brsl open meeting of Simmons 
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship to- 
day at i 15 In loom m 

The Beverend Virgil Gerb< 
tanl mlnlsti r and director of Foung 
Peoples Activitiw ni Tremont Tem- 
ple, will Bpeak 



the Assembly t'ommittoe and the 
CSSA at Uinebeon Aft<-r dinner coffee 
will he served in the lounge when 
TSSA members and the faculty will 
have an opportunity to meet the Presi- 






College Observes 
Columbus Day 

Columbus Day, October 12, will be 

observed at Simmons this year, as 

will Washington's Birthday, February 

83 and Memorial Day, May 9*. 

The observance of these Holidays 

rated by the Faculty at the end 

i ' jreai aftei stjidenLa protested 

i i tin Buspenaton ol nil one-day 

as were suspended 

1 toy, November IX 
and Patriots Day, April 19. No 



Gordon Joslin 
Directs Simmonaires 



it- glad to provide 'musi- 


eoi roi 


any college 


laide lh 


1 Prate, presi- 


1 today. 




i Is to 


be director of 




Orchestra this 


in Is aj 


Instructor of 




i school. The 


jlayed i 


Oder bis diree- 


Btdenfa 


receplion last 



I'l 



Plans for the year were discussed 
t the first meeting: of the year, which 
mas held at i m in the Assembly Hall. 

Rehearsals aw held every Wednes- 
day at 4:10 in the Assembly Hall. 
*weaty oandidates have atgae4 up at 
resent, and Miss Del *T*te oaid that 
H etudeats who pl-a? musical instru- 
lents are invited to attend. 



MIT Frosh Sponsor 
Freshman Dance 

The MIT dorm freshmen have in- 
vited the Simmons dorm freshmen to 
attend a dance October n at the 
Walker Memorial ovyr at Tech, Jane 
Reynolds, chairman of the social 
activities committee, said today. 

The Tech chairman of social activi- 
ties Is making all the srraagementB 
for the dance. 



'-*^ ggggggggggfl 



' ■ 




&*UftiiU School (fMdttea fwcj,, 



Three times a year, the girls of the English 
School put out their brainchild — Fen Ways. 
There's no way that a Simmons girl can possibly 
ignore the existence of this magazine, because the 
staffs always conduct an extensive publicity 
campaign. 

Fen Ways provides a chance for the girls in the 
English School to put what they have learned in 
class to actual practice. They take the jobs of 
editors, business managers, illustrators, and other 
staff jobs, and publish a magazine that is enjoyed 
by students and faculty alike. 

Fen Ways also gives any student the chance to 
see her name in print, whether it accompanies a 
story, a poem, an article, or an illustration. Every 
issue uncovers new talent, and brings praise to 
both the writers and the editors. 

In May of '44, the juniors took over the pub- 



Spring issue: back roiv, Martin, Madden, Sheats, 

Saint, Goldman. Seated, Dean, Hammel, Lehrman, 

Ricci, Flynn 



Junior issue: Matson, Demirjian, O'Hearn, Erlandson, Ricci, Dean, Ramsdell, Sullivan 




[70] 



Bimmcmb' b&U teller 



lishing of Fen Ways. Editor Blanche Erlandson 
and her staff turned out an issue which featured 
stories by Connie Ramsdell, Marilyn Matson, and 
Miriam Jones; humor by Irene Saint; and articles 
by Shirley Potts and Constance Leighton. 

The first senior issue, published in December 
of '44, was headed by Gloria Landsman. It fea- 
tured a letter from Eleanor Roosevelt, an article 
by Louise Randall Pierson, of "Roughly Speak- 
ing" fame, another article on faculty wives, and 
stories by undergraduates. 

March, '45, saw another issue of Fen Ways 
being read about school. Emily Lehrmann headed 
the staff, and published an issue featuring stories 
by Priscilla Wheelock, Rita Hammel, and Sylvia 
Olfson; humor by Katrine Sorensen, Peggy 
Stratton, and Anita Soddeck; and articles by 
contributors. 



Winter issue: back row, Birnie, Poskus, Scott, 

Goldman, Landsman, Meserve, Sheats 

Seated, Whelan, Friedman, Jones, Chesley 









[71] 



C 





intide ttotof 0/ blood, iiueat, 



Editor-in-Chief, Ellie Demirjian, thumbs the dummy 



1945 Mic has had its face lifted! In spite of war- 
time shortages and rising costs, the present staff 
of Mic decided to splash color here, there, and 
everywhere, and really give the book a modern and 
good-looking layout. 

For the first time each senior rated a separate 
place in the Senior Section for her write-up and 
formal. Sixty-eight additional pages of the year- 
book had fuschia-and-powder blue color accents. 
Layouts were diversified to the extent that each 
spread was a unit in itself. More space was de- 
voted to college activities and social events. The 
editors had informality as the keynote. 

In May of '44 Mic staff began work with the 
selection of the yearbook photographer. Ex-Edi- 
tor-in-Chief Marilyn Matson planned the general 
outline of the book during the summer. In the 
fall the staff added their comments and sugges- 
tions, the dummy was made up, and work 
started in earnest. Associate Editors Mary Whalen 
and Connie Ramsdell took on the job of pounding 
the seniors for their personal write-ups and in- 
formal snaps. Photo Editor Bunny Diamond did 
the same for the senior formals. Later on the staff 



Michael Microcosm sits in with Ramsdell, Matson, Whalen, 
Calusdian, Demirjian, Greenhalgh, Diamond 



Budget discussion by Michelson, Calusdian, Green- 
halgh, Demirjian 




[72] 



and teate. 



took off an entire afternoon to count the results of 
the Senior Poll. 

The photographer could be seen practically 
hanging from the chandeliers to get that special 
shot that the editors constantly demanded. In 
November, MlC Dance started the year's round of 
social activities with a big bang with the help of 
much dancing, a waltz contest, and a door prize. 
Every Tuesday saw Circulation Manager Jean 
Greenhalgh at Mic payment table in the hall 
where seniors and Simmons inhabitants emptied 
their piggy banks. The editors could see the bud- 
get begin to balance, and Business Manager Isabel 
Calusdian could actually manage a smile, with the 
help of the contributions of Advertising Manager 
Ann Michelson. 

In February Ellie Demirjian, Art Editor, took 
over the position of Editor-in-Chief when Marilyn 
Matson resigned because of illness. Mimi Tuton 
was chosen to fill Elbe's place. 

Then came the usual last minute rush of galley 
and page proofs, and copy, copy, and more copy. 
The dummy was pasted up, caption and headlines 
pulled out of the air. Finally with the aid of a stiff 
dose of aspirin, Microcosm went to press. 

Mic Dance — 1915 




'How about a cut on this page?'''' says Tuton. 
'We just got the proof of this today." 




[73 




anvpAtb kidi lead a kaieidcUcafuc li^e 



"Has anyone seen the mail?" "Who's got my 
white socks?" "Let's go get a frappe at P.A.'s" 

"How about a game of bridge?" —Yes, bedlam 
is certainly the word to describe life at the Sim- 
mons dorms. 

Breakfast, the forgotten meal, finds most of the 
dorm population catching an extra forty winks of 
sleep, unmindful of a first hour class at 8:45. Still 
half asleep, they stumble along to 300 The Fen- 
way, and gradually start to wake up in the mid- 
morning. 

Others, more ambitious, get up at six after a 
late bull session or bridge game the night before, 
to read their psych or write their shorthand. Those 
with a heavy schedule rush back for lunch and a 
quick cigarette before afternoon classes send them 
away again. 



Late afternoon is the time for anything, from 
writing a long over-due letter to washing the in- 
evitable laundry. Comes dinner, with its weekly 
faculty guests, and a dash for Evans' elevator, 
while stairs do double duty for hungry hordes. 

After-dinner conversation is apt to stretch for 
two or three hours in the smokers, and then study- 
ing in earnest begins. The smokers do twenty-four 
hour business. 

Week-ends start with a rush of phone calls and 
dates, and an occasional gang off to the movies to 
forget about the man shortage. The lucky catch 
trains to all points of the compass for a week-end 
out of town. 

Crackers and soup, butts and cokes, books and 
typewriters — the continual rush and the happy 
go-lucky confusion. That's dorm life! 



Bluettes rehearse in Evans smoker 




[74] 




5th floor gab-feat 




Buggies, everybody out! 




a itux&if ojj pjefi^etuxil motion 



"Can't wait now — I've got to make the 8:09!" 
With this battle cry, commuters dash for trains, 
busses and trolleys. From near and far they gravi- 
tate toward the Fenway, bent on making that 
first-hour class. Locker doors clang wildly as coats 
are thrown in and books are pulled out before that 
mad dash up the stairs, but commuters are used to 
this, and usually arrive in class gasping furiously 
for breath. After Park Street in the rush hour, they 
can face anything once the damage is repaired 
with the aid of lipstick and comb and a fervent 
prayer. 

Commuters, who rarely have time for breakfast, 
eagerly await that lunch hour. Undaunted by the 
fearful line, they inch their way toward welcome 
food. Tables are at a premium and time even more 
so. Some linger through two lunch hours while 



others gulp a sandwich and run for class. Discus- 
sions are carried over from previous classes, and 
the latest gossip is daily exchanged, punctuated 
with "Pass the salt, please. " 

The Lounge is the commuter's living room at 
Simmons. Between classes, they drift in to relax 
or join in a conversation with a group of friends. 
Life, The New Yorker, and the current newspapers 
are well-thumbed. 

For those commuters who crave a game of 
bridge and enjoy a cigarette, the butt-room with 
its informal atmosphere is the perfect answer, and 
also the most crowded room at Simmons. 

From two o'clock on, the exodus of commuters 
begins. Lucky are the girls who can leave early, for 
commuters with late classes invariably get caught 
in the rush hour jam. 



8:Jf^ repair job 



Lunch and lit in the locker 




77] 



m « 



*$?****>■ 








AnJ044A4(ll 




leana the n&p,e6, jnxun tLeisi 



Orientation Week started the Freshmen on 
their four-year journey through Simmons. Arriv- 
ing breathless and a trifle scared, they took exams, 
met Junior sisters, and had a reception in their 
honor. Then came Bib Party which Stu-G gave 
for Freshmen and their Junior sisters, giving the 
Class of '48 a chance to get acquainted with Sim- 
mons students and faculty. 

Class officers were announced in November on 
Freshman Campus, and they were: President, 
Pepper Mainwaring; Vice-President, Dot Chesley; 
Secretary, Marcia Lelong, and Treasurer, Skip 
Davis. Also announced were Class colors, coral 
and silver; Class flower, gardenia; Class Advisor, 
Mr. Warren Tryon; Class mascot, Frisky Colt. 

Executive Board and Stu-G representatives 
were elected, and soon the Sophomores gave a 
Valentine Party for their sisters. Freshman For- 
mal rolled around in May, and the year ended 
with May Day and the hanging of baskets on 
Junior sisters' doors. 



Officers: Lelong, Davis, Mainwaring, Chesley 



Meeting the faculty at Freshman Reception 




fjuni&i liitesi date. 



Following tradition, the Juniors welcomed the 
Freshmen during Orientation, introducing them to 
Simmons in a grand and glorious manner. October 
brought the Stu-G Bib Party and more fun for the 
sister classes. 

In February, Juniors donned formals for their 
Prom, and made history by giving the first dinner 
dance in three years at Simmons. Added to this 
memory was that of the Bridge Party, held in the 
cafeteria, the profits of which went toward making 
the Prom a success. 

The Freshman-Junior Jamboree began a brand- 
new tradition in March, costume dress being the 
admission ticket. At this affair, the two classes 
were united in an impressive candle ceremony, 
followed by refreshments and fun. 

This year's Junior officers are: President, Mar- 
garet Wilson; Vice-President, Harriet Leighton; 
Secretary, Ruth Becker, and Treasurer, Marjorie 
Twombly. The chairman of Junior Welcome Com- 
mittee was Martha Reilly. 




Officers: Becker, Wilson, Twombly, Leighton 



Seniors serenade at Junior Prom 



Tripping the light— 




[83] 




make 4x*fJuAtic<rfion AmMxIm&I the 



Sophomore year — the time when you really 
grow up; no longer bewildered freshmen, nor quite 
worldly seniors, but important enough to deserve 
informal greetings from upperelassmen and re- 
spectful gazes from our lessers. It's also the time 
you begin concentrating on your career; subjects 
acquire a new magnetic power. 

This power is not so great as to attract you 
from the great social whirl of Sophomore year. The 
Class of '47 began with a hilarious Hallowe'en 
party with beans and franks. To perk up after 
exams and get in the spring mood, Freshman 
sisters were entertained at the Valentine party. 
The Soph Shuffle at the Sheraton, then Senior 
play day, and finally Soph Luncheon, where the 
Class of '47 was really bonded by the rings and 
complete harmony of an unforgettable afternoon. 

Class of '47 officers were: President, Barbara 
Seim; Vice-President, Katherine Casey; Secre- 
tary, Dorothy Blair, and Treasurer, Barbara 
Burke. 



Officers: Blair, Seim, Casey 



Sophs invade the lounge 




[84] 



Yes, we're another wartime class; but like the 
rest of the country, we have tried to make the best 
of it. 

Besides cramming for that esteemed degree, we 
flocked to the U.S.O.'s, the Officers' Clubs, and 
other volunteer war agencies. We also found time 
for a Bridge Tournament which really challenged 
the skill of the butt-room experts. Then winter 
wound up with a Servicemen's Dance and a really 
swell time at Old English Dinner. 

Came spring, and everything started to pop. 
Our earlier enthusiasm dissolved into a frantic 
despair which we cured by collapsing on the back 
steps. Practice Work called us back to business, 
and soon Class Day rolled around. With Senior 
Week came the happy ending to a memorable four 
years. Our class officers were: President, Nancy 
Rich; Vice-President, Bette EmhofT; Secretary, 
June Whitfield; Treasurer, Betty Borgeson; Song 
Leader, Barbara Taylor. 




Officers-: Taylor, Borgeson, Rich, Whitfield 



'See us marching by. 




[85] 




*»•. 



I i 



&N 




1 





♦ — I 



w 




MILDRED VICTORIA ACKER 

Millie, 51 Amesbury St., Quincy, Mass. Nursing. 
Student Council, Mass. General, 3, 4; FEN 
WAYS 1, 2; Committees: Capping, 3; War 
Service, 2; Clubs: Anne Strong, 1, 2, 3, 4; Musi- 
cal Association, 1, 2, 3; YWCA, 1, 2. 

neaf, sincere, friendly and yet professional . . . . 
loves art, subways, eating. . .postcards on parade, 
to the army air corps. 




RUTH E. ALSEN 

103 Jason St., Arlington, Mass. Business. Clubs: 
Seribunal, 2, 3, 4; U.S.S.A., 4. 

quiet, but capable of starting fun . . likes the army 
air forces .. .wants to be a private secretary, but 
most of all wants a position with plenty of variety 
. . .if she's your friend you're lucky. 




NANCY GRAY BAKER 

Nan, 204 Craig Ave., Freeport, N. Y. Science. 
Class Vice Pres., 2; Dorm Council, 4; Dorm 
Board, 4; House Chairman, 4; Committees: War 
Service, 2; May Party; .Soph Shuffle; Soph 
Luncheon; Junior Welcome; Ellen Richards, 
2,3,4. 

looks good on dance floors and in chem labs . . .adds 
to dull sessions and nightly bridge games. . .mind 
on physics but heart overseas. 



PHYLLIS JEAN BAKER 

Jay, 225 Oakwood Ave., West Hartford, Conn. 
Library Science. Transfer Committee, 4; Clubs: 
Dramatic Association, 3, 4; 020, 3, 4. 

petite, peppy, proficient. . .knits that "funny 
ivay" .. .loves old houses, war and peace... off 
key, on key, when it comes to singing. . .a mucho 
rapido pedestrian and ready listener. 





RUTH BEARDSLEE 

472 Vine St., Bethlehem, Penna. Library Science. 
Academy, 4; 020, 3, 4. 

the gal with the chestnut broivn locks and the 
friendly gleam. . .super to be with and a genius 
to boot. . rare combination blended to perfection . . 
whizzes thru cooking, studies and junk... not 
meant for the d.c. 





ELEANOR RUTH BERGNER 

Elbe, 34 McKinley Ave., Lowell, Mass. Business. 
Clubs: Seribunal, 2, 3, 4; Unity, 1. 

nibbles on chocolate bars... quick retorts ... con- 
noisseur of popular orchestras . . .confirmed pun- 
ster. . .strange ability for walking with eyes 
closed on mornings .. can hold both man and 
career. . drags out knitting anywhere. 






EMILY BARBARA BERKE 

Em, 34 Manomet Rd., Newton Centre, Mass. 
Science. Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; Musical 
Association, 1; Outing, 1; Le Cercle Francais, 1. 

if there's any mail (male), it belongs to emily. . . 
full of pep and always a smile. . ."oh kids, what 
do I do now'''", noted for her numerous phone 
calls and work- done on time. 





RUTH B. BERNARD 

Ruthie, 32 Woolson St., Mattapan, Mass. Busi- 
ness. MICROCOSM, 4; NEWS, 4; Committees: 
Daisy Chain; NEWS Dance, 3; Clubs: Hillel, 3, 
Publicity Chairman, 4; Menorah, 1, 2; Musical 
Association, 1; Scribunal, 2, 3, 4. 

yi! ... adorable pug nose, trim ankles ... spends 
Wednesdays pounding news typewriter . . . lores 
sailing and tuba players. . .candid. 



PHYLLIS DOROTHY BERNAU 

Phyl, 79 Otis St., Milton, Mass. Business. Stu-G, 
Assistant Treasurer, 3, Treasurer, 4; House 
Chairman, 1; Committees: Soph Luncheon 
Waitress, 1; Daisy Chain; President's Reception 
and Baccalaureate Usher; Baccalaureate and 
Commencement Choir, 1, 3; Clubs: Musical 
Association, 1; Scribunal, 4, Secretary, 2, Vice 
President, 3. 

efficiency plus . . . belittles her own talents. 



IPHIGENIA VIRGINIA BILMAZES 

Jini, 29 Vestry St., Haverhill, Mass. Library 
Science. NEWS, 1, 4; Clubs: Le Cercle Francais, 
1;020, 3, 4. 

hand-knit socks, knit one, purl one, drop two. . . 
nary men are magnets for jini . . .pet diversions: 
music, movies and horseback riding. . .colophon is 
a smile and a friendly word. 




BETTY LOIS BORGESON 

Borgie, Williams St., Holden, Mass. Business. 
Stu-G Secretary, 3; Class President, 2, Vice 
President, 1, Treasurer, 4; Committees: Fresh- 
man Formal Chairman; Soph Shuffle; Junior 
Welcome; Bib Party, 1; Olde English Dinner 
Chairman, 3; Junior Prom; Daisy Chain 

tall, good-looking blonde .. .lores dancing, ice 
cream, champagne, and cats. . ."that's right"... 
efficiency plus. 



JEAN ELEANOR BOWKER 

Jeannie, Forestville, N. Y. Business Clubs: 
Dramatic Association, 1; Le Cercle Francais, 1; 
Pan American, 3, 4; Scribunal, 2, 3, 4. 

have to really know her to appreciate her. . .ready 
for anything screwy .. .sense of humor... true 
friend .. sprouts poems, songs and stories... 
Canada, music, and Canada... pet peeves: short- 
hand, topsyturvey rooms, hats 




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MARIAL LOUISE BOYAR 

44 Lexington St., Everett, Mass. Science Clubs 
Dramatic Association, 1, 2, 3, Vice President, 4 
Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; Musical Association, 1, 2 
U.S.S.A. 4. 

passion for tennis, golf, argyle socks. . .loves 
dances, annapolis hops ... member of butt room 
brigade. . poetry fiend and actress of repute. . . 
looks — 1.5; figure — 1:2; brains — 2.0, personality — 



GRACE ELIZABETH BOYD 

G.B., 663 Andover St., Lawrence, Mass. Science. 
Daisy Chain; Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; 
Musical Association, 3, 4; Outing, 4; U.S.S.A. 
3; I.V.C.F., 4. 

none more appreciative of a good joke than grade 
. . few can top her rare moments. . conscientious- 
ness not overdone. . .behind that unassuming 
manner is one swell kid. 




BARBARA M. BRADLEY 

Barb, 182 Lowell St., Peabody, Mass. Business. 
Assembly Suggestion Committee; Clubs: New- 
man, 3, 4; Outing, 3, 4; Scribunal, 4. 

lores crowds. . .hopes to make dancing an avo- 
cation . . .firm believer in spur of the moment fun . . . 
dinner dates and plays. . yale is in the lead at 
present. 



DOROTHY BURDICK 

Dot, 98 Longwood Ave., Brookline, Mass. Home 
Economics. Class Executive Committee, 3; 
Inter-Club Council, Secretary, 4; Committees: 
Soph Shuffle; Freshman-Junior Wedding Usher, 
1; Commencement and President's Reception 
Usher; Clubs: Dramatic Association, 1, 2, 3, 
President, 4; Musical Association, 1; Art, 1. 

poise, personality, humor .. bridge and plays. 



ERINA A. BURKE 

Rina, 52 Fairfield St., Brockton, Mass. Business. 
Stu-G Representative, 3; Honor Board, 4; 
Committees: May Party Chairman, 3; Junior 
Prom; Transfer; Commencement Usher; Clubs: 
Newman, 1; Scribunal, 4. 

smooth but not sophisticated . . .charming con- 
servatism that cracks occasionally .. .whistles. 





FRANCES BURPEE 

Frannie, 200 Young St., Manchester, N. H. 
Nursing Clubs: Anne Strong, 1, 2, 3, 4; Musical 
Association, 1, 2. 

happy-go-lucky . . . devil-may-care . . . not a day 
from m.b.e.. . .the most work done with the least 
effort. . .eats, sleeps and eats again, and has a 
heck of a good time at it. 




STrlPv 








MARION LOUISE CADIEUX 

Ona, 85 Walter St., Newton Centre, Mass. 
Business. NEWS, 4; Clubs: Newman, 4; Scri- 
bunal, 4. 

one of the "six for 
dancing, and maine. 

. . . want* to combine 



can't quite figure 
loyal to the cause. 



dewey" . . .lores skiing. . . 
. interest in army engineer 
writing with farming and 
how. . .slightly stubborn but 





ISABEL CALUSDIAN 

Is, 112 Clayton St., Worcester, Mass. Business. 
MICROCOSM Business Manager, 4; Clubs: 
Dramatic Association, 3; Scribunal, 2, 3, 4; 

U.S.S.A. 4. 

dark- hair, sparkling eyes that are always smiling 
...a gal made to wear red. ..mad about cokes 
and Spanish music. . pinches pennies for mic. . . 
"sorry, i can't stop now — ire got to catch my bus." 



JANET EVANS CAMPBELL 

Cam, 214 Highland St., Milton, Mass. Nursing 
Clubs: Anne Strong, 1, 2, 3, 4; Musical Associa- 
tion, 1; Outing Trips Chairman, 1, 2, President, 
3; YWCA, 1 

crazy, lazy. . enjoys a sail. . .complains no mail 
. . . "oh well, if i write a letter, tomorrow VII do 
better" . . .she still can't hold a retractor but. may 
even yet become a nurse. 



MIRIAM CAPLOE 

Mimi, 109 Winchester St., Brookline, Mass. 
Science. NEWS, 1; Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 
4; English, 1; Hillel, 3, 4; Menorah, 1, 2; Musical 
Association, 1; Forum, 3; U.S.S.A., 4. 

with the goodness of the sweetest angel, the alertness 
of an owl's mind, she foils on and on and on, a 
successful life to find. 




LILLIAN AMELIA CARLSON 

Lilly, 25 Sunset Ave., Medford, Mass. Business 
FEN WAYS, 3; Clubs: Outing, 3; Scribunal, 
2, 3, 4. 

a winning smile, an eager listener . . cape cod and 
next year favorite topics of conversation . . allergic 
to Swedish dances, navy men, and strawberry ice 
cream sodas. 



KATHERINE ANNJTARRAS 

3881 Silsby Rd., Cleveland, Ohio. Prince. 











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JEAN CARROLL 

Jeannie, 54 Sagamore Rd., Bronxville, N. Y. 
Preprofessional. Committees: Soph Luncheon; 
Curriculum; Commencement; Senior Luncheon; 
Outing Club, 1, 2. 

always smiling and rushing some place .. .likes 
symphony, Chinese art, tech men and philosophy . . . 
"meet yon in the butt room" . . .obliging, cheerful, 
and a swell person to know. 



DORIS CARTER 

Dot, 15 Clearway St., Boston, Mass. Business. 
Inter-Club Council, Treasurer, 4; Committees: 
May Party, 3; Cap and Gown; Inter-Club 
Council Dance, 4; Clubs: Unity, 1; Scribunal, 
2,4. 

bewitching brown eyes .. .winning smile... mad 
about white orchids. . .likes tech men and marines, 
which adds up to one thing — page! . . stay as you 
are, dor is. . .'nuf said. 




CONSTANCE ETHEL CEDERBERG 

Connie, 25 Commonwealth Ave., Attleboro, 
Mass. Nursing. May Party Committee; Clubs: 
Anne Strong, 1, 2, 3, 4; Musical Association, 1; 
Outing, 2; I.V.C.F., 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council, 
Mass. General. 

likes night duty, green, pork chops, and the cape. . . 
fresh air fiend .. .California, here i come... as 
Swedish as smorgasbord. 



BARBARA STEWART CHAPIN 

Chape, 205 Main St., Southbridge, Mass. Busi- 
ness. Honor Board, Secretary, 4; Committees: 
Cap and Gown, Chairman, 4; Daisy Chain, 3; 
Senior Luncheon, 3; Baccalaureate and Com- 
mencement Usher; Clubs: Christian Science, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Musical Association, 1; Outing, 1; 
Scribunal, 3, 4. 

a whiz at sports . . . not quiet, but conservative. 



BARBARA CHESLEY 

Bobbie, 324 Ames St., Lawrence, Mass. English. 
FEN WAYS, Assistant Business Manager, 4; 
Unity Club, 1. 

the cosmopolite with her own basic english . . . 
adores nary blue, especially with gold braid.... 
complete extrovert. . .has statistics to prove her 
theories about shorthand . . tells a joke uniquely . . . 
headed west, her Utopia, in June. 





JEANNE PRISCILLA CLARK 

Chloe, 42 Chickatabot Rd., Quincy, Mass. Pre- 
professional. Class Executive Committee, 2, 4; 
Commit lees: Freshman Frolic; May Party; 
Freshman -Junior Wedding; Hobo Party; Clubs: 
Outing, 1; Pan American Publicity Manager 
3,4; VW'CA, 1,3, 4. 

petite, laughing. . .effervescent personality . . .loves 
rhumbas ... intense about politics, food, boogie- 
woogie and plans for the future. 






_i 





JEAN COHEN 

Jeanie, 34 Fessenden St., Mattapan, Mass. Pre- 
professional. Clubs: Hillel, Social Activities, 
Chairman, 8, President, 4; Menorah, 1, 2; Out- 
ing, 1, 2; Inter-Club Council, 4. 

college would be fun without so many classes... 
spends time playing bridge. . likes all kinds of 
sports, little stuffed animals, reading til 4 a.m. 





ELIZABETH HITCHCOCK COLEY 

Bette, 66 Washington Terrace, Bridgeport, 
Conn. Business. Olde English Dinner Commit- 
tee, 4; Scribunal, 3, 4; YWCA, 3. 

twentieth century "jeannie with the light brown 
hair" . . .slender, shy. . .long walks, driving a 
car and tennis are favorite diversions. . .but. she 
really shines at writing letters. 




LORETTA GRACE CONLEY 

Chicky, 6 Winter St., Stoneham, Mass. Science. 
Ellen Richards, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

irish blue eyes. . .infectious laughter. . fun-loving 
. . .good-natured . . .in due time catches on to a 
joke . . . wears a marine emblem close to her heart. . . 
loves tennis . . . enthusiastic piano-player . . . an 
expert amateur at bridge. 



HELEN M. COOPER 

Coop, 52 Brighton Ave., Portland, Me., Science 
Ellen Richards, 3. 

carries the "keys of her kingdom" on a chain . . . 
all-round sportsman .. .throws a good deal of 
bull in her chosen field ... permanent interest in 
texas . . .can do anything from cracking a nut to 
welding a seam. 




VALERIE MAE CORSON 

Val, 299 Salem St., Bradford, Mass. Business. 
Clubs: Musical Association, 1, 2; Scribunal, 3, 4; 
Unity, 1. 

known by her quick smile, infectious laugh, and 
brown twinkling eyes. . .pet hate: orange marma- 
lade. . .lores dancing to south american music, 
riding, lobsters, and anything lavender. . .strictly 
a navy woman with a few army diversions. 



ELLA BENEDICT COWLES 

Ellaby, North Woodbury, Conn. Nursing. 
Clubs: Anne Strong, 1, 2, 3, 4; Musical Associa- 
tion, 1, 2, 3; Unity, 1. 

"e coli . . ."for pete's sake, wood"... a package 
from home .. ."let's get something to eat".... 
commutes from hospital to campus. . jams mail 
box with the woodbury reporter ... infectious 
giggle and a ferocious appetite. . .the name is 
cowles like coal, and please, get it right. 














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BARBARA J. CRAVEN 

Bobbie, 6510 N. 11th St., Philadelphia, Penna. 
Prince. House Chairman, 2; Committees: 
Transfer, 4; Daisy Chain. 

neat as a pin; dimples cute as a button. . .a person- 
ality that radiates. . .efficient. . well-dressed, even 
when lifeguarding in conn. .. .a one-man woman 
. . . weaknesses: french poodles, Vermont and luce. 




VIRGINIA CREIGHTON 

Crate, 86 Dutcher St., Hopedale, Mass. Busi- 
ness. Committees: Olde English Dinner, 4; 
Daisy Chain; Scribunal, 3, 4. 

"dayton calling creighton" .. .smooth dresser... 
charm bracelets, hand-knit socks, and black 
dresses galore .. .bridge fiend ... n.j.c.'s loss was 
Simmons' gain. 




JANE ELLEN CURTIN 

Curt, 65 Tudor St., Methuen, Mass. Business 
College Voucher, 4; Committees: Soph Luncheon 
Waitress, 1; Junior Welcome; Bib Party, 2; 
Daisy Chain; Clubs: Musical Association, 1; 
Newman, 1, 4; Scribunal, 4. 

"let's go out for a coke" . . .faded dungarees . . . 
starched shirt . . .casual, carefree, adores bridge 
and dinty moore's steaks. . .seductive voice. 



ETHEL FLORENCE DAY 

92 Lowell St., Somerville, Mass. Home Eco- 
nomics. 





ALICE M. DEAN 

Bobby, West Bridgewater, Mass. English. 
NEWS, 1, Assistant Technical Editor, 2; FEN 
WAYS, Assistant Technical Editor, 3; Clubs: 
English, 1, 2, 3; Unity, 1, 2. 

sunshine in her hair and disposition, bobby is one 
of those little girls who goes over in a big way . . 
loves music, dancing and warm weather... in 
particular, liebestraum, the rhumba, and the west. 





BARBARA PENNELL DEARDEN 

Barb, 64 Second St., North Andover, Mass. 
Business. Class Executive Committee, 4; Clubs: 
Scribunal 2, 3, 4; YWCA, 1. 

hates jewelry. . .loves red sweaters, dancing, devil- 
dogs, and tech men . . .hasn't a worry in the world 
. . . who would, with all her assets? 



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BERNICE DE COSTA 

Charleston, South Carolina. Home Economics. 
Clubs: Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; Outing, 4; 
YWCA, 2. 

comes from sunny south and has a sunny disposi- 
tion to go with it. . .seems reserved, but when you 
know her, she's full of fun. . a deep thinker, too 
. . enjoys a speedy game of ping pong, "knocking 
down tenpins," also riding along scenic trails. 





ELEANOR I. DEMIRJIAN 

Ellie, 17 Woodward St., Newton Highlands, 
Mass. English Class Executive Board, 4; NEWS 
3, 4; MICROCOSM, Editor-in-Chief, 4; FEN 
WAYS, Art Editor, 3; Committees: Junior 
Prom; Daisy Chain; MIC Dance, Chairman, 4: 
Baccalaureate and Commencement Choir, 3; 
Clubs: Dramatic Association, 1, 2; Le Cercle 
Francais, 1, 2, 3, 4; Unity, 1, 2. 

two-tone hair. . ."slurpy" . . frank, unpredictable 
. . . mad about a marine, rhumbas, and food. 



DORIS EVELYN DESMET 

Dot, 9 Merrymack View Ct., Lawrence, Mass. 
Nursing. Anne Strong, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

slow and easy, but always on the ball . . florida via 
pan american airlines. . .gold band. . handy with 
the needles, both sewing and hypo. . blondie with a 
sense of humor. 



BERNICE S. DIAMOND 

Bunny, 14 Foster St., Brookline, Mass. Business. 
NEW ; S, Business Manager, 3, 4; MICROCOSM, 
Photography Editor, 4; Committees: War 
Service, 3; Daisy Chain; Baccalaureate and 
Commencement Choir, 3; MIC Dance, 4; Junior 
Prom; Clubs: Hillel, 3, 4; Menorah, 1, 2; Musical 
Association, 1; Pan American, 2, 3, 4; Scribunal, 
2, 3, 4; U.S.S.A., 3; Publicity. 

slim . . . taffy hair . . . decollete necklines and black- 
dresses . . .loves to samba and rhumba. 




NELLIE MAY DICKINSON 

Dickie, Lisbon, N. H. Nursing. Student Council, 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, 3, 4; Anne Strong, 
1,2,3,4. 

tail, dark and handsome .. nice to know... 
knittiri 's fun . cigarettes and parties. . ivy plants 
and embryos. . .no mean student. 



JEANNE E. DINE 

32 Park Vale Ave., Allston, Mass. Science. 
Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; Hillel, 3; Menorah, 
1, 2; Musical Association, 1; Le Cercle Francais, 
1. 

tall, cute and slender. . preference for casual 
clothes, bridge, and thomas wolfe. . .ivears a 
sparkling diamond. . .her heart belongs to the 
army .. .headed for big things and lots of hap- 
piness. . .very soon. 










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JACQUELINE D. DOYLE 

Jackie, 101 Riverside St., Lowell, Mass. Science. 
Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 4; Secretary -Treasurer, 
3; Newman, 1, 2; Le Cercle Franeais, 4. 

french enthusiast. . .ooh, la la! what hair and 
lashes .. .flashing brown eyes... gay laughter... 
navy has edge on her affections. . .smooth dancer 
. . . petite but with a mind of her own . . . good for a 
fourth at bridge at any time. 



KATHERINE EILEEN DRISCOLL 

Kay, 37 Vincent Ave., Belmont, Mass. Science. 
Honor Board, 1; Social Activities Committee, 3; 
Committees: Junior Welcome; Cap and Gown; 
Commencement Invitations; Daisy Chain; 
MIC Dance, 3; Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; 
Newman, 2, 4; Outing, 1; YWCA, 1. 

always happy with laughing blue-green eyes. . . 
turned-up nose .. .bubbles with enthusiasm .. in 
perpetual motion . . . born optimist. 




HAZEL PATTERSON EATON 

86 High Ridge Rd., Worcester, Mass. Science. 
Inter-Club Council, 4; Clubs: Academy, 3, 
Secretary, 4; Anne Strong, 1, 2; Ellen Richards, 
3, 4; Outing, 1, 2, Secretary-Treasurer, 3, Presi- 
dent, 4. Soph Luncheon Waitress, 1. 

an outdoor girl. . .always ready for anything. . . 
loves week-end outing trips and foreign food. . . 
square dance enthusiast . . .sure bet for fun. 



MRS. MARY ANN L. ELIOT 

Mai, 372 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. Pre- 
professional. Dorm Council, 1, 2; Dorm Board, 
1: Committees: Assembly Suggestion, 3; May 
Party, 3; Ring Committee Chairman, 2. 

always looks as if she just stepped out of Hz arden's 
. . .passion for psych, bridge, and symphony . . 
knitting socks for ted in class. . .loves double role 
of student and housewife. 



BETTE E. EMHOFF 

Bee, 735 N.E. 17th Way, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 
Prince. Class Vice President, 4; MICROCOSM, 
2; Committees: Junior Welcome; Ring; Senior 
Luncheon Waitress, 3; Daisy Chain; Clubs: 
Christian Science, 3; Pan American, 3. 

smooth dancer, smooth dresser. . florida tan, 
wonderful conversationalist. . .passion for baked 
alaska. . devoted to flash-gun casey. 





JUDITH ROSALIE EPSTEIN 

Judy, 15 York St., Dorchester, Mass. Prepro- 
fessional. NEWS, 2, 3; Clubs: Hillel, 3, 4; Menor- 
ah, 1, 2; Le Cercle Franeais, 1; Outing, 1;U.S. 
S.A.,3,4. 

blonde, petite, and lovely. . bradshaw crandatt 
profile .. .blue clothes, a particular med student 
and nursery training school. . .wants to be a good 
doctor's wife. 







BLANCHE E. ERLANDSON 

101 Decker St., Milton, Mass. English. FEN 
WAYS, Editor-in-Chief, 3; NEWS, 3, 4; Com- 
mittees: Assembly Suggestion, 8; Junior Wel- 
come, 3; Hobo Party, 4; Daisy Chain. 

gets the best results with the least effort, frank, 
impulsive, and has an answer for everything... 
lores bridge, cigarettes, and is always ready to try 
something new and different. 




. 




DARTHEA F. FEARING 

Dott, 30 Buckingham Rd., Quincy, Mass. 
Science. Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; Musical 
Association, 1, 2; YWCA, 1, I.V.C.F., 1, 2, 3, 4. 

hides her light under a bushel but has a quiet 
friendly grin. . .bets on the human race every time 
. . .partial to kodachrome and likes to walk and do 
things on the spur of the moment. 





HILDE HENRIETTE EEIGE 

38 Groveland St., Springfield, Mass. Science. 
Clubs: Ellen Richards, 3; Musical Association, 1. 

from far-off europe, she came to sirnmons, and the 
accent still remains. . .in the field of science she 
hopes to make her claims. . .spare moments not 
taken with bugs of all sorts are spent knitting and 
in outdoor sports. 



BETSY FOLEY 

Bets, 25 Redgate Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Business. Honor Board, 4; Committees: Fresh- 
man Formal: Soph Luncheon; Junior Welcome 
Chairman; Baccalaureate, Commencement, and 
President's Reception Usher; Senior Luncheon 
Waitress. 

dimples and sparkling brown eyes. . whiz at 
bridge .. .bubbling personality .. lores tuna fish 
and ice cream . . .those dangling earrings. 




DOROTHY ANNE FORRESTER 

Dort, 21 Orsini Drive, Larchmont, N. Y. Home 
Economics. Clubs: Christian Science, 1, 2, 3, 
Vice-Chairman, 4; Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; 
Orchestra, 1, 2, Vice-President, 3, 4. 

easy-going . . .lores sleep. . .thrives on olives, lob- 
ster, and brigham sundaes. . .never studies but 
gets a's and b's. . .smooth pingpong game, and a 
flash in her eye. 



ELIZABETH M. FOSS 

Betty, 79 Grove Ave., Leominster, Mass. Home 
Economics. Transfer Committee Chairman, 4. 

her life not a pattern but an original design . . . 
sincerity, with enthusiasm and gaiety. . .of tolerant 
mind and depth of heart. 










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ROBERTA B. FRANK 

Bert, 14 Abbotsford St., Roxbury, Mass. 
Science. Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2,3,4; Hillel, 3,4; 
Menorah, 1, 2; Outing, 1; U.S.S.A., 4 

where is she? . . . in the chem lab or writing letters . . . 
always has a bit of news to tell. . .is never hungry 
. . keeps a picture diary of all her doings. . no 
wonder she's so photogenic. 



SHIRLEY M. FRIEDMAN 

Shirl, 183 Keer Ave., Newark, N. J. English. 
FEN WAYS, Assistant Technical Editor, 4; 
Clubs: English, 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel, 3, 4; Menorah, 
1, 2; Pan American, 1. 

"yon just hare to take one of sypher's courses'" . . . 
shirl's enthusiasms are balanced between learning 
and her gift of friendliness, .she excels each 
mortal thing upon the earth. 




MARY T. GAFFNEY 

Gaffie, 185 Maple St., Danvers, Mass. Science. 
Class Executive Board, 1; Committees: Fresh- 
man Formal; Junior Prom; Freshman-Junior 
Wedding Usher; Baccalaureate and Commence- 
ment Choir, 3; Clubs: Dramatic Association, 1; 
Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; Musical Association, 3. 

map of ireland on her face .. .loves music and 
tickles the ivories expertly. . .sensitive and a wor- 
rier. . humor lively and refreshing. 



JUDITH OILMAN 

Judy, Chelsea, Vermont. Home Economics. 
Clubs: Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; Outing, 3. 

quiet, but with a sense of humor. . .loves biking, 
hiking and square dancing. . .anything sporty. . . 
commutes busily knitting socks and mittens. . . 
earnest, but not ardent student . . pastry cooking is 
really something. 



GERTRUDE GOLDMAN 

Gert, Washington St., Norwell, Mass. English. 
NEWS, 3, 4; FEN WAYS, Advertising Man- 
ager, 4; Clubs: English, 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel, 3. 
Executive Board, 4; Menorah, 1, 2; U.S.S.A, 
2, 3, 4. 

alwuys with something on her mind and a smile on 
her face. . .loves yardley's and the country. . . 
hates subways and city flats. . . never has time to do 
anything for herself, but still looks trim and ef- 
ficient. 





DOROTHY MAY GOODHIND 

Dot, 23 Brown St., Palmer, Mass. Business. 
Daisy Chain; Clubs: Musical Association, 1, 2; 
Scribunal, 2, 3, 4; Unity, 1. 

///c brand of sweetness you meet once in a lifetime 
and lasts longer than that. . good-natured as they 
come ... movies are her weakness ... sincerity her 
forte. . rare naivete, infectious smile .. .beautiful 
eyes. 




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MARIAN E. GRANT 

Bibs, 20 Connecticut Ave., Norwalk, Conn. 
Business. Class Executive Board, 2; Olde Eng- 
lish Dinner Committee; Clubs: Art, 1; Christian 
Science, 1, 2, 3, 4; Scribunal, 4. 

bibs, the lively cricket of the third floor. . favorite 
topic: maude, claude, fraud, and broad. . absent- 
minded about accounts receivable. . riotous reper- 
toire of sad ballads. 





JEAN MARCIA GREENHALGH 

Halghy, 46 Hilltop St., Quincy, Mass. Business. 
Social Activities Committee, 1; Class Secretary, 
3; NEWS, 3, 4; MICROCOSM Circulation 
Manager, 4; Committees: MIC Dance, 4; Fresh- 
man Formal; Junior Prom Chairman; Daisy 
Chain Chairman; Clubs: Glee, 1, 2, 3, 4; Scrib- 
unal, 2, 3, Treasurer, 4; Orchestra, 3, 4. 

life of any party. . . billy fell asleep at mic again! 
. . .does anyone want a bite of a stale doughnut? 



VIRGINIA GREENWOOD 

Ginny, 101 Andover St., Lawrence. Mass. Sci- 
ence. Clubs: Academy, 3, Treasurer, 4; Ellen 
Richards, 2, 3, 4. 

appears quiet, but is loads of fun . . . has a wonderful 
sense of humor and a friendly nature. . fond of 
winter sports and math, but fonder still of dart- 
mouth iveekends and bob. . .always ready with a 
joke or pun. 



(MRS.) SALLIE GRINNELL BIRNIE 

Sal, 736 Cambridge Blvd., Grand Rapids, 
Michigan. English. Assistant House Chairman, 
4; House Social Chairman, 4; Dorm Council, 4; 
Dorm Board, 4; FEN WAYS, Art Editor, 4; 
Transfer Committee, 4. 

our gal sal. . . no pet. peeves but longs for California 
sunshine. . .content yet concerned . . aesthetic taste. 




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LUCIENNE GROW 

Lucy, 73 Parkman St., Brookline, Mass. Prepro- 
fessional. NEWS, 3, 4; NEWS Dance Commit- 
tee, 3; Clubs: Hillel, 3, 4; Menorah, 2; U.S.S.A., 
4. 

"girl around town" ... smooth as silk .. moans 
over exams and amazed as a's roll in . . . wants to be 
a social worker but may be sidetracked by marriage 
or woman's page reporting. 



MARY ALICE GRUBE 

Grub, 11 Fairfield Ct., Keene, N. H. Science. 
Stu-G Vice President, 4; Honor Board, 3; Class 
Secretary, 2; Song Leader, 1, 2, 3; Committees: 
Freshman Formal; Soph Luncheon Chairman; 
Junior Prom; Junior Welcome; Baccalaureate 
Usher Chairman; Clubs: Academy, 3, 4; Ellen 
Richards, 2, 3, 4. 

towhead from hills of n.h. .. .bridge, butts and 
blackjack . . .personality plus and brains to boot. . . 
"up in munsonville," 








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RITA HAMMEL 

16 Highland St., Revere, Mass. English. NEWS, 
Assistant Editor, 2, Editor, 2, 3, Editorial 
Board, 3, 4; Clubs: Academy, 3, 4; Dramatic 
Association, 1; Hillel, 3, 4; Menorah, 1, 2. 

sweet and pelife. . .little gal with a big brain. . . 
hopes In take the radio world by storm .. likes 
four-inch heels, up-do's. . .and the navy. 



ALTHEA G. HANSON 

Skippie, 38 Mills St., Bristol, Conn. Home Eco- 
nomics. Class Executive Board, 4; Inter-Club 
Council, 4; Committees: Baccalaureate and 
Commencement Choir, 3; Daisy Chain; Clubs: 
Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; Musical Association, 
1, 2, Secretary, 3, Business Manager, 4; I.V.C.F., 
1, Secretary-Treasurer, 2, President, 3, 4. 

a real swede. . .winter sports . . .waits for mail. 




MARTHA HANUSHEK 

Marty, 28401 Lincoln Rd., Bay Village, Ohio. 
Home Economics. Assistant House Chairman, 
4; Dorm Board, 4; Dorm Council, 4; Clubs: 
Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; Musical Association, 1. 

a bright smile and pleasant word for all. . sports 
a p.g.p. pin and proudly shows her diamond. . . 
everyone who knows her knows johnny. 



BARBARA CATHERINE HARLOW 

Barb, Barre Plains, Mass. Library Science. 
Daisy Chain; Clubs: Newman, 1, 2, 3, 4; 020, 
3,4. 

sunny disposition . . reads and knits at the same 
time. . .prefers sweet pickles and sweet music. . . 
subtle wit . . . horses, horses, crazy over horses. 



FRANCES ELLEN HARRINGTON 

28 Day St., Whitman, Mass. Home Economics. 
Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4. 

those gentle eyes are capable of blazing . quietly 
purposeful, fran will get where she's going while 
the rest of us are on the way. . can't wait to be on 
her own. . interests: food, music, food, nary, and 
food. 





VIRGINIA A. HATFIELD 

63 Moraine St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. Business. 
Committees: Senior Luncheon Waitress; Daisy 
Chain; Clubs: Newman, 1, 2, 3, 4; Scribunal, 2, 
3, 4. 

five foot two, eyes of blue. . .chock full of personality 
charm, poise and individuality .. .loves music, 
books, plays and football, not, to mention her man 
in khaki. 



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LANEYA LUELLA HEATH 

Neva, 34 Leslie Rd., Auburndale, Mass. Nursing. 
Junior Welcome Committee; ('lul)s: Anne Strong 
1, 2; Dramatic Association, 1; Musical Associa- 
tion, 1. 

casual, sweet ... sweet, neat... ok, pish-tush! . . . 
monopolized by Harvard Med . . .wedding bells in 
June. . .butt and bridge fiend . . debates are her 
forte. 




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LOUISE JEAN HENDR1CKSON 

Lou, 42 Windemere Rd., Rochester, N. Y. Home 
Economics. Class President, 1; House Chairman, 
3; Dorm Board, 3; Dorm Council, 3; Inter-club 
Council, 4; Committees: Assembly Suggestion, 
2; Soph Shuffle; Junior Prom; Freshman-Junior 
Wedding; Junior Welcome; Baccalaureate, 
Commencement and President's Reception 
LTsher; Clubs: Home Economics, 2, Secretary, 3, 
President, 4; Musical Association, 1; YWCA, 1. 



BARBARA MERLE HODGKINS 

Barbe, 44 Columbus Ave., Waltham, Mass. 
Home Economics. Commencement LTsher; Clubs: 
Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; YWCA, 2. 

dark hair, brown eyes. . quick on the comeback. . . 
she's the answer to the $6.J question. 



AGNES SHIELA HYDE 

Hydie, 45 Carlisle St., East Chelmsford, Mass. 
Home Economics. Social Activities Committee, 
3; Committees: Junior Welcome; Hobo Party 
Chairman; Baccalaureate, Commencement, and 
President's Reception Usher; Daisy Chain; 
Senior Luncheon Waitress; Clubs: Home Eco- 
nomics, 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman, 1, 2, 4; Outing, 1, 2, 
3; Pan American, 1. 

heart of gold. . .the navy way. . good natured. 




JANET FRANCES HYDE 

Jan, 38 Horace Rd., Belmont, Mass. Business. 
Honor Board, 3, Chairman, 4; Dorm Council, 4; 
Dorm Board, 4; NEWS, 3; Committees: May 
Party; Olde English Dinner; Transfer; May 
Breakfast; Daisy Chain; Baccalaureate, Com- 
mencement, and President's Reception Usher; 
Senior Luncheon Waitress; Clubs: Dramatic 
Association, 3; Pan American, 2, 3, 4; Scribunal, 
3,4. 

all the assets, but modesty plus . . .mie dance! 



FRIEDA HYMOWITZ 

43 Howland St., Roxbury, Mass. Science. Clubs: 
Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; Menorah, 1, 2, 3; Musical 
Association, 1; U.S.S.A., 3; Russian War Re- 
lief, 3. 

don't be deceived by her demure manner. . .ever see 
her face light up at the mention of reed? . . .ever see 
her giggle at results in the dark room? . . her future 
. . .a mixture of art and biology. 




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DORIS JACKSON 

Jackson, 9 Cabot Road, North Andover, Mass. 
Home Economics. Stu-G Representative, 4; 
Committees: Baccalaureate, Commencement 
and President's Reception Usher; Daisy Chain; 
Clubs: Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; YWCA, 1. 

mystery woman. . always has work done yet al- 
ways fooling . . .Ifth floor jokcstcr . . blond hair . . . 
big grin . . . dry wit. 



D. CLOVER JELLIS 

Codey, 71 College Ave., West Somerville, Mass. 
Library Science. Clubs: Anne Strong, 1, 2, 3; 
Outing, 1; 020, 4. 

the girl who is always in a hurry . . dates on steak 
and mushrooms . . hand-knit sweaters. . .aspires 
to be a medical librarian, but only until the war 
ends and bill comes home. 




MIRIAM ISABELLE JONES 

Jonesy, 29 Kahler Ave., Milton, Mass. English. 
FEN 'WAYS, 3, Technical Editor, 4; Commit- 
tees: May Party; Junior Welcome; Daisy Chain; 
Clubs: Dramatic Association, 1, 2; English, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Musical Association, 1; Outing, 1. 

tall, blond, and smooth. . .bubbling wit that's 
rarely concealed . . past master at getting along. . . 
thrives on the new and different. . .seldom fazed. 



SUZANNE KALDECK 

Susie, 591 Morton St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Science. Social Activities Committee, 2; Class 
Executive Board, 1; MICROCOSM, 3, 4; Com- 
mittees: Freshman Frolic; Daisy Chain; Fresh- 
man-Junior Wedding; Baccalaureate and Com- 
mencement Choir, 3; Clubs: Ellen Richards, 
2, 3, 4; Menorah, 1, 2; Le Cercle Francais, 1, 
Vice President, 2, President, 3; Outing, 3; 
YWCA, 3; U.S.S.A., 3. 

Vienna's loss is our gain . . .a little girl. 



DOROTHY VIRGINIA KELLY 

Dot, 699 Washington St., Brighton, Mass. 
Science. Soph Luncheon; Clubs: Ellen Richards, 
4; YWCA, 1. 

"fill the steins to dear old maine" . . .is her theme 
song. . .casco bay her second home. . .she is always 
at ease on a lab or piano stool. 





CHARLOTTE M. KELTON 

Kelt, 75 Orchard St., Franklin, N. II. Nursing. 
House Chairman, 3; Dorm Board, 3; Anne 
Strong Club, 1,2,3,4. 

she's fall, she's pretty, and the buys call her "red" 
. . .she's smart as they come and always ahead . . . 
she has all the men at her feet, you bet. . .but 
there's only one man for her — that's chet. 








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HELEN F. KENNEY 

Pidge, .'55 Langley Rd„ Brighton, Mass. Busi- 
ness. Class Day Waitress; Daisy Chain; Chilis: 
Newman, 2, 8; Scribunal, 2, 3, 4; YWCA, 4. 

petite, blonde, dynamic . .efficient home economist 
and secretary .. .loyalty, consideration, and sin- 
cerity make a genuine friend . . .lores old nicks and 
scituate .. .bright lights attract her, too. . good 
natured. 



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M. LUCILLE KINGSTON 

106 College Ave., West Komerville, Mass. Home 
Economics. Committees: Hobo Party; War 
Service Chairman, 4; Senior Luncheon Waitress; 
Baccalaureate, Commencement and President's 
Reception Usher; Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4. 

handy with needle and thread. . loves steak and 
mushrooms . . home ec has done its job preparing 
her for bob's return. . .bridge fiend. 



RUTH ELIZABETH KLABE 

6 Aspen St., Roxburv, Mass. Science. Clubs: 
Ellen Richards, 4; YWCA, 1, Vice President, 2. 

career? . . oh yes. . .at present, the pride of harvard 
med. . .ambition plus capability .. like a good 
time? ...you bet... quiet evenings a phobia... 
discount as home-loving type. . .secret fascination 
. . .arthur fiedler . . .California, here I come! 



LOIS ATHALIE KNIGHT 

Waterbury, Vermont. Nursing. Clubs: Anne 
Strong, 1, 2, 4, President, 3; Musical Association, 
1. 

a letter from kenny . . .rum cokes... a hurried 
stride, a worried look. . curly hair and laughing 
eyes. . .that's athalie arm. 




ANNE FRANCES KNOTT 

4 Commonwealth Ter., Brookline, Mass. Home 
Economics. Committees: Assembly Suggestion 
Chairman, 4; Soph Shuffle; Curriculum, 3, 4; 
Inter-Club Council Dance; Lunchroom Co- 
Chairman, 4; Clubs: Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; 
Outing, 1; Pan American, 1. 

friendly smile. . .poise plus. . gloucester and 
m.i.t. summers. . .well groomed. . biochemistry. 



SHIRLEE E. KORETSKY 

167 Walnut St., Chelsea, Mass. Library Science. 
NEWS, 1, 2, 3, 4; NEWS Dance Committee, 3; 
Clubs: Academy, 4; Hillel, 3, 4; Menorah, 1, 
2, 3; 020, 3, 4. 

easy on the eyes .. .tooth-ad smile... an intel- 
lectual, but on her it looks good . . . interests in 
u.s.o. and p.a.c, ballet russe . .. good natured... 
ambitious and dynamic. . yen for travel. 





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NATALIE KOTZEN 

Nat, 68 Clark Ave., Chelsea, Mass. Library 
Science. Class Executive Board, 4; Daisy Chain; 
Clubs: Hillel, 3, Treasurer, 4; Menorah, 1, 2; 
Le Cercle Francais, 1; 020, 3, 4. 

weaknesses — food and fun. . .loves corny jokes, 
classical music. . .dislikes shakespeare, dressy 
clothes and people who get off a huntington car at 
arlington. 




LISE KURZMANN 

30 Chiswick Rd., Brookline, Mass. Library 
Science. War Fund Chairman, 2; Clubs: Musical 
Association, 4; 020, 4. 

devastating smile. . infectuous laugh. . .snapping 
dark eyes . . . enthusiasm abounding . . favorite 
haunt, the backstep. . .a woman of varied interests 
and many moods, but always ready for fun. 




HAZEL HELEN LAGER 

Snookie, 5 Jenny Lind St., New Bedford, Mass. 
Library Science. Clubs: Ivy-S, 3, 4; 020, 3, 4. 

girl with the pin-up smile and the blonde bangs. . . 
mad about architecture, men and opera... also 
jewelry and boy's shirts. . slightly scatterbrained, 
but definitely darling. 



MARGUERITE ELEANOR LAING 

Marg, 22 Converse Ave., Newton, Mass. Science. 
Clubs: Ellen Richards, 4; Outing, 3, 4. 

a vivacious blond who takes everything in stride and 
never worries . . . after two years at college in the 
south, she finds boston somewhat baffling, but marg 
will get around! 





GLORIA RHODA LANDSMAN 

Glo, 55 Elm Hill Ave., Roxbury, Mass. English. 
NEWS 2, Feature Editor, 3, 4; FEN WAYS, 
Editor-in-Chief, 4; Clubs: Academy, 3, 4; 
English, 1, 2, 3; Hillel, 3, 4; Menorah, 1, 2. 

the perfect combination of brains, breeding, and 
beauty. . .has a passion for chatter and jewelry . . . 
is the answer to a city editor's prayer. 





DORIS MARIE LANG 

D, 14 Falcon St., East Boston, Mass. Business. 
Business School Representative to Executive 
Board, 2; Clubs: Newman, 1, 2, 3, 4; Scribunal, 2, 
3,4. 

raven hair, madonna eyes. . likes to wear smart 
black outfits and silver earrings-. . frank, sincere, 
and capable of forming independent decisions. . . 
loves six-footers and vacations at naushon. 






H. ELISABETH LARSON 

Betts, "><> Lithgow St., Dorchester, Mass. Nurs- 
ing. Chilis: Anno Strong, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic, 1; 
Capping Committee. 

elisabeth with an "s", a cape, some salve, and a 

hot water bottle on night duty eats iee cream and 
.sandwiches at any hour .. .likes flowers, books, 
chow mein, sebago and bull sessions. 





DOROTHY LASH 

Dot, 928 High St., Fall River, Mass. Prepro- 
fessional. NEWS, 1, 2, Social News Editor, 8, 4; 
Clubs: Menorah, 1, 2; Hillel, 3, 4. 

tiny, trim, and smooth — those big brown eyes. . . 
adores plays, ice cream pie, and nice clothes. . . 
loves to worry. . .date ability terrific! 



(MRS.) CATHERINE GOMATOS LA VRAKAS 

Catie, 1 Mifflin PI., Cambridge, Mass. Prepro- 
fessional. Preprofessional School Representative 
to Executive Board, 3; Clubs: Le Cercle Fran- 
cais, 1; Outing, 1, 2. 

"johnny says" .. .main interest is the nary... 
likes horseback riding . . .a constant habituee of the 
butt room but doesn't "indulge" and can't play 
bridge! 



JULIA HOGUE LAWSING 

Julie, Randolph Center, Vt. Home Economics. 
Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4. 

quiet, but can make herself known .. .devotion 
to rermont challenged only by Cambridge in the 
spring. . fascinated by introspection . . most ami- 
able friendships are with men and puppies. . . 
loves eating and dancing. 




(MRS.) EMILY R. LEHRMAN 

Emmy, 358 Walnut Ave., Roxbury, Mass. Eng 
lish. NEWS, 2, Assistant News Editor, 3, 4 
Clubs: Academy, 3, 4; English, 4; Hillel, 3, 4 
Menorah 1, Treasurer, 2; Forum, 2; USSA, 3, 4 
Russian War Relief, 2, Chairman, 3, 4. 

loves dancing, especially formats, but hard work is 
her meat .. .writing, translating, teaching, or 
speaking, so long as it's her native russian. 



HELEN M. LEVEY 

38 Walnut Ave., Revere, Mass. Home Eco- 
nomics. Clubs: Menorah, 1, 2; Hillel, 3, 4; Home 
Economics, 2, 3, 4. 

can't sit through a class without doodling. . thinks 
constantly of a post-war home. . loves dancing but 
waits for furloughs . . .tired of being called "baby- 
face" . . .wishes she were the glamorous type. 












^ / 







ALICE L. LIDWIN 

320 Elm St., Lawrence, Mass. Home Economics. 
Clubs: Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; Newman, 3, 4; 
Le Cercle Francais, 2; Baccalaureate and Com- 
mencement Choir, 3. 

few of us possess the curls, without the aid of pins 
and curlers. . .a little twinkle in her eye, one not- 
ices as he goes by. . forever busy with consulta- 
tions, but a moment to spare for consolations. 



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SHIRLEY LINDGREN 

193 Glenwood St., Maiden, Mass. Business. 
Clubs: Outing 3; Scribunal, 2, 4; Unity, 2. 

she stands out in a crowd because of her height, 
red-blond hair, smart clothes, and quiet manner . . . 
one of those people that no nickname fits. . .likes 
wearing black, sleeping, eating, swimming, and 
playing bridge. 




EUNICE MAY LITTLEFIELD 

Eunie, Shore Rd., Ogunquit, Maine. Home 
Economics. Clubs: Christian Science, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; Musical Assn. 1. 

"she wears a pair of silver wings" . . .eunie, the 
chief cook for those midnight snacks. . likes her 
music sweet and dreamy. . favorite phrase, 
"anyone tvant to go to the drug?" 



MARY ANN LOUGHLIN 

371 Maine St., West Concord, Mass. Library 
Science. Clubs: Newman, 3, 4; 020, 3, 4; Daisy 
Chain. 

she comes from that neck of the woods where once 
the embattled farmers stood. . little and dark. . . 
her favorite indoor sport, nightly letters to eddie . . . 
ahcays ready to go to the movies. . .and "every- 
thing's dippy." 





EVELYN M. LUCAS 

Ev, 5 Adella Ave., West Newton, Mass. Science. 
Ellen Richards Club, 2, 3, 4. 

quiet in everything she says and does, yet has 
definite convictions and a sense of humor. . . 
couldn't be neater. . .is cooperative, efficient, and 
easy to work with . . . has an interest in the army 
but keeps mum about it. 





LUCILLE ANN LUNDY 

Lundy, 143 Beale St., Quincy, Mass. Prepro- 
fessional. Representative to Stu G 4; NEWS, 4; 
MICROCOSM, 4; Clubs: Newman, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Le Cercle Francais, 3, Vice President, 4; YWCA, 
3; USSA, 3, 4; Usher at Baccalaureate, Com- 
mencement, and President's Reception, 3; 
Curriculum Committee, 3, 4; Daisy Chain. 

commuters' dream on stu g. . .lundy, the wit. 






^.'ifc 



MARIAN MARTHA McCLUNG 

127 High St., North Andover, Mass. Business. 
(Mulis: Musical Association, 1; Scribunal, 3, 4; 
Daisy Chain. 

petite and unruffled. . .disappears at the mention 
of bridge . . .weak spot for lemon meringue pie anil 
scotch plaid. . .laugh* with a punch. 





RITA MARY McFARLAND 

64 Colby Rd., North Quincy, Mass. Home Eco- 
nomics. Clubs: Newman, 1, 2, 3, 4; YWCA, 1; 
Home Economics Representative to Executive 
Board, 3. 

blue eyes, and the real thing in curly hair. . .a lire 
wire that sparkles. . ."i'm not hungry, but what've 
we got to eat?" . . . life is great, and so are people! 



DORIS McGUIRE 

Dorie, 16 Parkway West, Bloomfield, New 
Jersey. Science. Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; 
Le Cercle Erancais, 1; Outing, 1. 

bridge, the drug, the movies, dorie is your woman . . . 
archery and golf her favorite outdoor sports. . . 
always can see her coming with those bright ker- 
chiefs. . .if you're looking for a grand time, count 
on dorie. 



M. MARJORIE MacISAAC 

Margie, 1292 Commonwealth Ave., Allston, 
Mass. Preprofessional. NEWS, 1; Clubs: New- 
man, 1, 2, 3, 4; USSA, 3, 4. 

the perfect companion for gay moods. . .has an 
appreciation of the finer things in life such as men 
and food. . .infectious laughter. . intends to be a 
career girl. . has an incapacity to make income 
equal outgo. . .she would like to meet the man who 
invented logarithms! 




KATHLEEN E. McKENNA 

283 La Grange St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Business. Clubs: Newman, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing, 1; 
Scribunal, 2, 3, 4; Committees: Junior Welcome; 
Daisy Chain; Commencement Usher, 3. 

red head without a temper. . .very sincere, she is 
gracious, energetic and determined . . .has a keen 
sense of humor, loves books, plays, music and 
football. 



FRANCES MADDEN 

Fran, 106 Elmer Rd., Dorchester, Mass. Eng- 
lish. Class Executive Board, 1, 2; Clubs: New- 
man, 1; Le Cercle Erancais, 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary, 
1, 2; Outing, 3; Chairman War Service Com- 
mittee, 4; Freshman-Junior Wedding Brides- 
maid. 

spends most of her time rushing from here to 
rhode island . . .bane of her existence, the butter line 
at morgan's . . .deep brown eyes. . .quiet until she 
pops up with a pun. 





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(MRS.) MARY MAHONEY SHE ATS 

Moe, 34 Maple St., Watertown, Mass. English. 
FEN WAYS Feature Editor, 4; NEWS, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Clubs: English, 4; Musical Association, 1; 
Newman, 1, 2, 3, 4; Le Cercle Franca is, 1 ; 020, 2, 
3; Senior Luncheon Waitress; Daisy Chain; 
Baccalaureate and Commencement Choir, 1, 2, 
3; NEWS Dance Committee, 3. 

sophisticate icith an impish sense of humor. . . 
is an incurable hydrant-jumper. 



HELEN MARINGAS 

228 Union St., Franklin, Mass. Science. Clubs: 
Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; YWCA, 3, 4. 

what a grin.' .. meet it any place, any time... 
likes baseball but lores the red sox (is that why she 
always wears red?). . .appreciation personified . . . 
couldn't miss that laugh and that hair if you tried. 




ALISON MARTIN 

Allie, Main St., South Yarmouth, Mass. English. 

exotically mysterious . . dark eyes that shine upon 
receipt of billets doux c/o postmaster, san francisco 
. . .carefree and gay till the english school caught 
up with her, but still finds time to sparkle at 
hasty pudding club. . .humorous and optimistic . . . 
allie and chloe inseparable. 



MARILYN ANDREA MATSON 

Mat, 67 Commonwealth Rd., Watertown, Mass. 
English. MICROCOSM Associate Editor, 2, 
Staff, 3, Editor, 4; FEN WAYS, Associate Edi- 
tor, 3; Clubs: Dramatic, 1; Newman, 1; Le 
Cercle Francais, 1, 2, Vice President, 3; Com- 
mittees: Junior Welcome; Freshman Formal; 
Freshman-Junior Wedding; Daisy Chain; Inter- 
Club Council, 4. 

pills and paregoric. . . "am i in class now?" 



DORIS MAY MAUKE 

Dot, 38 America St., Framingham, Mass. 
Science. Clubs: Ellen Richards, 3, 4; Musical 
Association, 1, 2; Outing, 1, 2; Baccalaureate 
and Commencement Choir, 1; Soph Luncheon 
Waitress; Curriculum Committee, 2. 

scientist and musician with a flair for everything 
feminine. . nights will never find her alone by the 
telephone. 





HILDA MEHRING 

Hildie, 1007 Scott St., Napoleon, Ohio. Prince. 

sharp-shooting "rifle queen" transfer . . . witty 
conversationalist. . rare sense of humor. . .wields 
pencil and paint-brush with professional skill.. . 
the most popular stranger in this fair metropolis 
. all this with blonde hair and blue eyes . . that's 
hilda mehring! 









ELEANOB MAY MEISEL 

Ellie, 590 Ocean Ave, Brooklyn, N. Y. Business 
and Prince. Ring Committee 2. 

radical change from saddles /<> pumps, from Sim- 
mons to prince. . lores boston but has a soft spot 
still for brooklyn and the dodgers. . .enthusiastic 

about dancing and department stores, .biggest 
interest resides in an army camp. 





JOAN MELBER 

450 Bronxville R<L, Bronxville, N. Y. Business. 
President of Stu G, 4; Honor Board, 3, Secretary, 
4: Cluhs: Dramatic, 3; Musical Association, 1; 
A Capellu Choir, 1; Pan American, 2,3, Vice 
President, 4; Scribunal, 3, Treasurer, 4; Com- 
mittees: Soph Shuffle; Junior Welcome; Ring; 
Olde English Dinner, 2, 3; Transfer, 4; Chair- 
man May Breakfast, 2; Usher at Baccalaureate, 
3, Commencement, 2, 3; President's Reception, 
3; Daisy Chain; Senior Luncheon Waitress. 

Madame President all-around gal. 



BARBARA ELLEN MERRILL 

Chum, 58 South Elm St., West Bridgewater, 
Mass. Library. Clubs: 020, 3, 4; Art Guild, 1. 

born librarian who in 318 had to unlearn all she 
learned in library a ... Saturday trips to boston 
bookshops and gilbert and sullivan are her special 
delights. . has a passion for anything orange, 
from mittens to book jackets. . good thing in a 
small package. 



MARILYN E. MESERVE 

Maz, 360 Washington St., Whitman, Mass. 
English. NEWS, 1, 2, 3, 4; FEN WAYS, Circu- 
lation Manager, 4; Clubs: English, 4; Le Cercle 
Francais, 1; Outing, 1, 2; Pan American, 3, 4; 
Scribunal, 2, Treasurer, 3; Unity, 1; Daisy Chain; 
Junior Welcome Committee; Commencement 
Usher, 3; Senior Luncheon Waitress, 3. 



always 



rush, and what a 



of humor! 




VIRGINIA CHAPIN MOORE 

Jini, 52 Hancock St., Lexington, Mass. Prince. 

one of original four in the two-year course at 
prince. . .favorite pastimes are the theatre, dancing, 
and golf. . .enjoys the company of musicians and 
medical students. 



EDNA CYNTHIA MORRISON 

Eddie, 157 Salisbury Rd., Brookline, 



Ma 



Preprofessional. NEWS, 3, 4; Clubs: Hillel, 3, 4; 
Menorah, 1, 2; Outing, 1; Le Cercle Francais, 1. 

future psychiatric social worker ... ( maybe) .. . 
known for her sympathetic understanding, her 
wavy blond hair, her hand-knit sweaters, and that 
man in new guinea. 




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MARIE LENORE MURPHY 

Murph, 104 Dorchester St., Lawrence, Mass. 
Home Economics. Class Treasurer, 3; Clubs: 
Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; Newman, 1, 2, Vice 
President, 3, President, 4; Daisy Chain; Com- 
mittees: Freshman Formal; I.C.C. Dance, 4; 
Senior Faculty Supper Waitress, 3; Usher at 
Commencement and President's Reception, 3. 

a twinkle in her eye and plenty of friends. 



LOUISE MARY NAWFEL 

Lou, 28 North St., Waterville, Maine. Nursing. 
Clubs: Anne Strong, 1, 2, 3, 4; YWCA, 1, 2. 

a gal who laughs a lot and is liked a lot . . full of 
pep. . happiest when the music's hot. swell 
nurse with a carefree heart. 




ELIZABETH P. NOCK 

Betty, 168 Humphrey St., Marblehead, Mass. 
Prince. Chairman of Prince, 4; Clubs: Ivy-S 
President, 3; Outing, 2; Daisy Chain; Transfer 
Committee, 3, 4. 

an outdoor gal with a sense of humor. . .lores the 
gay life but has her serious moments. . .frank, 
flirtatious, fun. . as much at ease on skis as she 
is on the dance floor. 



GRACE ELIZABETH NOREN 

100 Washington St., Manchester, Conn. Busi- 
ness. Stu C Representative, 2; Clubs: Dramatic, 
1; Outing, 1 ; Scribunal, 4; Unity, 1; Daisy Chain; 
Committees: Junior Welcome; Bib Party Chair- 
man, 2. 

big blue eyes. . .runs a date bureau . . passion for 
dill pickles. . lores a smooth dancer. . .1:30 bull 
sessions in 1^5. 



MARGARET TERRELL NUTTER 

Peggy, 15 Hawes Ave., Melrose. Mass. Science. 
Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; Musical Associa- 
tion, 2, 3; YWCA, 1. 

she's always busy so doesn't stop to talk long, but 
never fails to flash a cheerful smile .. likes good 
music and books between studies. . .aside from 
interest in chemistry of foods, many "reports" are 
written and received from a certain medical school. 








DOROTHY G. O'HEARN 

Dot, 593 Heath Si., Chest nut Hill, Mass. Eng 
lish. Stu G Representative. 1; NEWS, 1, 2, 3, 4 
FEN WAYS, Advertising Manager, 3; Clubs 
Dramatic, 1; English, 1, 2; Newman, 1, 2 
Committees: Junior Welcome; Transfer, 4 
Daisy Chain; President's Reception and Com- 
mencement I slier, 3; Senior Luncheon Waitress; 
Soph Luncheon Waitress; NEWS Dance 
( Committee, 2. 

a mighty cute colleen and full of fun. 









DOROTHY ANN OLDS 

Dot, 160 MerrimacSt., Methuen, Mass. Nursing. 
Anno Strong Club, 4. 

the nurse who "doesn't appreciate" anything but 
manages to get a big kick out of life, smiling all 
the while, .vacations in Canada, has a passion for 
reading . . a night on! of the first degree. 





MARY T. O'NEILL 

4 Laurel St., Lynn, Mass. Library Science. 
NEWS, 1, 2, 3, 4; Clubs: Newman, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Outing, 3; 020, 3, 4. 

that serene look hides a rare sense of humor. . . 
likes deep-sea fishing, dancing, tech and men 
in general . . plays great tennis and never minds 
milking to boston latin for the ball. . always 
efficient, competent, usually late, bid in her it 
looks good. 



V. -¥. 



(MRS.) ELAINE SNYDER PALMER 

Snyde, 61 Sixth Ave., Gloversville, N. Y. Home 
Economics. Clubs: Economics, 2, 3, Treasurer, 4; 
Musical Association, 3. 

has that contented look of a married woman . . . 
lores to emphasize the "mrs." when giving her 
name. . .next to harry comes her love for food, and 
she can cook it as well as eat it. 



GLORIA J. PEPI 

63 Lawrence Ave., Roxbury, Mass. Home Eco- 
nomics. Clubs: Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; New- 
man, 2, 4; Le Cercle Francais, 1; USSA, 3.4. 

she's merry, resourceful, always on the go but never 
too busy for a kind word or a friendly smile . . . 
rated tops in efficiency, sincerity and quality. . 
loves music, dancing and good food. . .hopes to 
visit brazil and California before Ifl. 




EVELYN MARIE PETERS 

Pete, 1788 State St., Hamden, Conn. Home 
Economics. Clubs: Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; 
Outing, 1, 2; Soph Shuffle Committee; Bac- 
calaureate and Commencement Lusher, 3; 
Daisy Chain. 

a gildersleeve giggle .. faithful to yale... black 
coffee, never less than two cups. . .football fan . . . 
loves to read and talk. . .always in a hurry. 



ELIZABETH M. PETERSEN 

Liz, Monument St., Concord, Mass. Science. 
Ellen Richards Club, 3, 4. 

the 7:51 out of concord every morning and the 
5:30 buck, what stamina! . .a farmer's daughter 
at heart, but an industrious professional gal by 
choice. . .she uorks as though she never played 
and plays as though she never worked. 









"S 







(MRS.) HELEN AMBROSE POSKUS 

Ambrose, 15 Chase St., Dorchester, Mass. 
English. Academy, 3, 4; NEWS, 2, 4; FEN 
WAYS, Business Manager, 4. 

jill of many trades and master of quite a few. . .a 
quirk change artist from business suit to apron. . . 
chief weaknesses are clothes and her husband. . . 
can swing a mean knife and fork, even at her own 
cooking! 






FRANCES POTTER 

Muffin, West Main St., Dudley, Mass. Business 
Scribunal, 2, 3. 

small, demure, but handle with care. . favorite 
phrase, ''now the efficient business woman"... 
can't hold on to her possessions two minutes and 
wonders where they could have gone. . .this wcbster 
whiz is the tonsorial artist of the main campus. 




FRANCES ANGELA PRONSKI 

Pron, 59 Upland St., Worcester, Mass. Business. 
Clubs: Musical Association, 3; Newman, 4; 
Scribunal, 2, 3, 4. 

seems bashful but when she gives out on that ac- 
cordion, she really gives. . .adores earrings; has 
all types, sizes, and colors. . .you can always rely 
on her. 





RUTH VICTORIA PURVINSKAS 

Purvie, 5 Hale St., Worcester, Mass. Nursing. 
Clubs: Anne Strong, 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman, 1, 2,3, 4. 



CONSTANCE RAMSDELL 

Connie, 67 Robbins St., Milton, Mass. English. 
Social Activities Committee, 4; Class Executive 
Board, 3; NEWS, 2, 3, 4; FEN WAYS, Feature 
Editor, 3; MICROCOSM, Associate Editor, 4; 
Committees: NEWS Dance, 3; MIC Dance, 4; 
Junior Welcome; Transfer, 4; Daisy Chain; 
Clubs: English, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing, 1, 2. 

small, dark, cute. . .wears clothes as they should be 
worn. . .will try anything once 








DOROTHEA RANKS 

Dot, 23 Keswick Rd., South Portland, Maine. 
Business. Clubs: Musical Association, 1; be 
Cercle Francais, 2; Outing, .Secretary-Treasurer, 
3, 4; Scribunal, 4; Unity, 2. 

ardent sports fan .. .loves pops concerts, square 
dances, murder mysteries, and butterscotch sundaes 
. . .main interest, the british navy. . .pet aversion, 
fire drills. 







HELEN SHIRLEY RAPHAEL 

Chick, 8 Pama Gardens, Brighton, Mass. Pre- 
professional. Clubs: Hillel, 3, 4; Menorah, 1, 2; 
Le Cerclo Francais, 1 ; YWCA, 1. 

noted for her vivacity, her ability for losing things, 
and her amazing metamorphosis from a sireater- 
and-skirl caterpillar to a glamour girl butterfly. . . 
chick's main interest is a dartmonth indian in the 
pacific. 




■MM ■ v 




ROSE M. RECITER A 

97 Woodeliffe St., Roxburv, Mass. Science. 
Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; English, 1; USSA, 
4. 

cute little trick. . .you can sec her Spanish blood 
in those sparkling eyes and that dashing smile. 



more conscientious than you'd think, 
you see her handsome mic date? 



and did 



JANE A. REYNOLDS 

Reni, 1622 Peoples Ave., Troy, N. Y. Home 
Economics. Stu G Social Activities Chairman, 4; 
Class President, 3; Clubs: Home Economics, 
2, 3, 4; Musical Association, 1; Committees: 
Soph Shuffle Chairman; May Party; Junior 
Welcome; Daisy Chain; Baccalaureate, Com- 
mencement and President's Reception Lusher; 
Senior Luncheon Waitress, ICC, 4. 

cute but smooth . .always a smile. 



LOIS WILBAR REYNOLDS 

Lo, 74 Depot St , South Easton, Mass. Library 
Science. Class Secretary, 1; NEWS Ass't Tech- 
nical Editor, 3, Technical Editor, 3, 4; Com- 
mittees: Freshman Frolic; Junior Welcome; 
Hobo Party; Olde English Dinner, 2. 

lores a good laugh .. has the kind of hair that 
looks even better in rainy weather ... always at 
home in a bridge game. 




ARLENE JANET RICCI 

46 Colby St., Belmont, Mass. English. FEN 
WAYS, Assistant Business Manager, 3; Clubs: 
Academy, 3, 4; Newman, 1, 2; Le Cercle Fran- 
cais, 1, 2, 3, Treasurer, 4; Outing, 3; Pan Ameri- 
can, 3, 4; USSA, 3, 4. 

curly brown hair and a wide grin. . .she's crazy 
about Spanish, folkdancing, and walking in snow- 
storms. . has a yen to see south america and 
china before she's forty. 



NANCY LOUISE RICH 

Nan, 2 York Rd., Belmont, Mass. Home Eco- 
nomics. Stu G Representative, 2; Class Presi- 
dent, 4, Vice President, 3; Clubs: Home Eco- 
nomics, 2, 3, 4; Outing, 1; Inter-Club Council 
President, 4; Committees: Soph Shuffle; Soph 
Luncheon; Junior Welcome; Olde English Din- 
ner, 3; Baccalaureate, Commencement and 
President's Reception Lsher. 

blonde and bright, with an art for bridge and danc- 
ing. . .a whiz at the piano. 














I 




DOROTHY G. RIPLEY 

Dotty, 400 Washington St., Braintree, Mass. 
Nursing. Anne Strong Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

the belle of braintree. . knows how to get a big buzz 
out of life, what with her annapolis weekends, her 
unique humor... and her rare tales of hospital 
trials on endless night duties. 



--en 



JEAN BARBARA ROBINSON 

Robbie, 80 Marian Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. 
Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4. 

can broil porkchops with that special touch. . .has 
a contagious giggle that supplements her good- 
nature. . .worst fault is tripping over beds and up 
the stairs. . .neat as a pin, punctual as a clock. . . 
somebody everyone likes. 







PHYLLIS ROBINSON 

84 Atherton Rd., Brookline, Mass. Science. 
Clubs: Dramatic, 1, 2; Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; 
Hillel, 3, 4; Menorah, 1, 2; Le Cercle Francais, 1. 

tall, lissome, and elfin, phyl can be heard saying, 
"but honestly, kids" .. .with an engineer and a 
chemist in the family, the lookout for things to 
come seems pretty good for this neat chick. 



ROWENA V. ROCKWELL 

Rocky, 1540 Sherbrook Rd., South Euclid, 
Cleveland, Ohio. Prince. Transfer Committee, 4. 

a loyal midwesterner .. moved from Minnesota to 
mielngan to ohio. . .lores symphonies, modern 
houses and Williams men . . . mail ranging from 
arm arbor to south pacific, India, and england . . . 
"deep in the heart of texas" her theme of the moment. 



YOLANDA E. ROMANELLI 

Yola, 25 Abigail Ave., Quincy, Mass. Business. 
MICROCOSM, 4; Clubs: Academy, Executive 
Committee, 3, President, 4; English, 1; Musical 
Association, 3, 4; A Capella Choir, 4; Newman, 1; 
Pan American, 1 ; Scribunal, 2, 3, 4; Committees: 
Junior Prom; Curriculum, 1; Daisy Chain; Bac- 
calaureate and Commencement Choir, 1, 2, 3; 
Inter-Club Council, 4. 

genius of the gang . . smoothest of clothes. 





(MRS.) BEVERLY ULLIAN ROSEN 

Bev, 24 Hamlin Rd., Newton Centre, Mass. 
Home Economics. Academy, 4; Clubs: Anne 
Strong, 1; Menorah, 1, 2; Hillel, 3, 4; Home 
Economics, 2, 3, 4; Musical Association, 1; 
L'SSA, 4; Transfer Committee, 4. 

big dimples and a pretty smile. . .despite her 
engagement in her junior year and marriage in 
her senior year, she still made academy .. .has 
modern ideas about teaching. 









ANN WOTHERSPOON ROSS 

Wernersville, Penn. Home Economics. Stu G 
Representative, 2; Assistant Vice President, 4; 
Clubs: Home Economics, 2, 4, Treasurer, 3; 
Outing, 1; Committees: Daisy Chain; Bac- 
calaureate, Commencement, and President's 
Reception Usher, 3; Senior Luncheon Head 
Waitress; Dorm Council, 3. 

attractive blonde who dresses well. . .quid, hut fun 
. . . up till all hours. 





ELEANOR M. RUGO 

Ellie, 321 Norfolk Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
Science. Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, President, 
4; Newman, 1, 2, 3; Le Cercle Francais, 1; 
Inter-Club Council, 4; Baccalaureate and Com- 
mencement Choir, 3. 

dr. bliss's satellite. . .kindness personified .. .has 
such beautiful hair it just isn't fair. . .perfectly 
content with a book of poetry. 



IRENE A. SAINT 

13 Monica St., Taunton, Mass. English. NEWS, 
Editor-in-Chief, 4; Inter-Club Council, 4; 
War Service Committee, 3; LTSSA, President, 3. 

"jaypers" . . .never gets to bed on Wednesday night 
until her "baby" has gone to press. . .genius extra- 
ordinary of the editorial column .. that name 
contradicts the true self. 



LOIS M. SAMUDA 

31 Braddock Park, Boston, Mass. Preprofes- 
sional. NEWS, 3, 4; Academy, 3, 4; Clubs: 
YWCA, 1, Cabinet, 2; USSA, 2, President, 4. 

small but able ... earnest executive. . bach and 
ellington. . .likes 'em tall and intelligent .. born 
social worker. . profundity beneath that smile. . . 
rational liberalism. . .brains with an aim. 




(MRS.) LOUISE H. SANGREN 

28 Iroquois Rd., Arlington, Mass. Home Eco- 
nomics. 



EDNA L. SAWYER 

Eddie, 46 Ainsworth St., Roslindale, Mass. 
Science. 

a packet of quiet, forceful, energy, explosive at times 
...waxes enthusiastic over tennis ... experience 
ranges from the secretarial world to the shipyards 
. . .bring on the chem labs! 




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IRENE BLANCHE SCHADE 

Rene, 28 Western Ave., Beverly, Mass. Nursing. 
Anne Strong Club, 1; Junior Welcome Com- 
mittee. 







M\?A > 



NAOMI FLORENCE SCOTT 

Seotty, 40 Trident Ave., Winthrop, Mass. 
English. MICROCOSM, 3; NEWS, Associate 
Editor, 1, Feature Editor, 2, Editorial Board, 
3, 4; FEN WAYS, Associate Editor, 4; Clubs: 
English, 2; Hillel, 3, 4; Menorah, 1, 2; Le Cercle 
Francais, 1; Committees: Class Executive, 3; 
Daisy Chain; NEWS, Dance Chairman, 3. 

cute, especially in pig-tails . . .human dynamo. 




SADAKO LOUISE SEKI 

Seek, Seattle, Wash. Science. Clubs: Ellen Rich- 
ards, 3, 4; YWC A, 3, 4. 

liny, vivid, fast and smiling ... new york and 
Washington, but ivest is still best . . .the lab is her 
natural habitat, including that of harvard tried. 



LELIA R. SERENA 

Lil, 595 River St., Mattapan, Mass. Science. 
Clubs: Ellen Richards, 3, 4; Newman, 1, 2. 

spontaneous and unrehearsed. . .perfectly de- 
lightful! 





MARGARET SHAW 

Miggie, 220 Walpole St., Norwood, Mass. 
Science. Class Executive Board, 3, 4; Ellen 
Richards, 2,3, 4. 

Simmons' 1 expert on plane spotting and navy regu- 
lations . . .always ready for a session of bridge or 
close harmony. . if you're looking for fun with 
the best of company, just page miggie! 





ESTHER SHERBURNE 

Abby, Middlesex Rd., Tyngsborough, Mass. 
Business. Clubs: Musical Association, 1; Scri- 
bunal, 2, 3, 4; Unity, 1; Daisy Chain; President's 
Reception Usher. 

cherubic disposition with eyes and, smile to mulch 
. . ."oh, how I hate to get up in the morning" . . . 
has thai easy-going attitude that's so refreshing. 



f 






BETTY CECILE SHERTEB 

Shirt, 11 Pembroke St., Newton, Mass. Nursing. 
Clubs: Anne Strong, 1, 2, 8, 4; Menorah, 1, 2; 
Vice President 3; Ilillel 3, 4; Musical Association, 
1. 





HARRIET F. SIBLEY 

74 Leighton RH., Wellesley, Mass. Library 
Science. NEWS; Clubs: Dramatic, 3; Outing, 3; 
020, 3, 4; Baccalaureate and Commencement 
Choir, 3. 

pixy look that belies that serious attitude. . .weak- 
ness for the nary . . chief dislikes are prunes, boys 
with lines, and caviar. . likes the definitely classi- 
cal, and baked apples. 



A. ELIZABETH SJOSTROM 

Betty, 34 Harwood Ave., White Plains, N. Y. 
Home Economics. 

partial to the nary. . .dimples and bright eyes. . . 
will never forget that night at p.a.'s. . .smorgas- 
bord fan. . lores pickled herring, cookies for ser- 
vicemen. . "if must be fate." 



NATALIE FARRINGTON SMITH 

Nat, 106 Overhill Rd., East Greenwich, R. I. 
Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4. 

beauty and disposition to charm any man. . .loves 
blue, lobster, and summers at cape cod. . a career 
of fashion designing (incidental to that tufts man) 
...pet mania, twirling her naturally wavy hair 
into corkscrews. 




DOROTHY SNELL 

98 State St., New Bedford, Mass. English. 

favorite diversions are backyard farming and sail- 
ing... loves crocheting and holds the world's 
record for losing crochet hooks... a movie fan 
who wouldn't miss abbott and costello or carmen 
mi rand a. 



ANITA SODDECK 

6 Colliston Rd., Brighton, Mass. Preprofessional. 
NEWS, 3, 4; Clubs: Hillel, 3, 4; USSA, 3, 4. 

intellectual with both feet on the ground. . .person- 
ality plus . . .men. . .new yorker sense of humor . . . 
writer of rare talent. . .sincere . . .ping pong and 
jane austen. 




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ESTHER ANNA SOLOMON 

91 Marcella St., Roxbury, Mass. Library Science. 
Academy, 3, 4; Clubs: English, 1; Menorah, 1, 2; 
Hillel, 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais, 1; 020, 3, 4; 
Daisy Chain. 

the ideal person to tell a joke to. . .most of those 
smooth clothes she wears are her own creations. . . 
likes sleigh rides and hot buttered popcorn. 



MILDRED V. STARRATT 

Mil, 48 Edmund Rd., Arlington, Mass. Home 
Economics. Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4; 
Verse Speaking Choir, 4. 

makes quite a hit in her home ec uniform. . en- 
joys pops concerts and new restaurants . . .has 
dreams of owning a restaurant and living in the 
country eventually. 







KATHARINE ANN STETSON 

Stet, 10 Huntington PI., New Hartford, N. Y. 
Home Economics. Clubs: Anne Strong, 1, Secre- 
tary, 2; Home Economics, 3, 4; Outing, 1, 2, 3; 
Musical Association, 1; Dorm Board, 3; Dorm 
Council, 3. 

the gal. with the beautiful long eyelashes. . .lots of 
fun to be with . . . never without something to do and 
always there to help at the right moment. . greatest 
enemy is spelling. 



MARTHA GWYNNE STILES 

434 Morris Ave., S.E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Preprofessional. Committees: Transfer, 4; Old 
English Dinner, 4. 

maisie, a successful combination of wisdom and 
wit. . .can readily catch the ironies of life in her 
interpretive cartoons. . .plaids and poker. . .keen 
in thought, progressive in mind, and individual 
in taste. 



GERALDINE A. SULLIVAN 

Gerri, 217 Hinckley Rd., Milton, Mass. Science. 
Academy, 3, 4; Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; 
Newman, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing, 1. 

gerri's daily paper is a tradition in the dorm . . . 
news isn't all she keeps up on, for bridge, chem, the 
milton corps and duxbury take plenty of her time . . . 
with all that and a good nature too, what more 
could one ask for in a girl? 




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PATRICIA A. SULLIVAN 

Pat, 28 Oakdale St., Brockton, Mass. English. 
FEN WAYS, Technical Editor, 3; Clubs: Eng- 
lish, 2; Newman, 1; Committees: Junior Wel- 
come; Transfer; Commencement Usher, 3; 
Daisy Chain. 

excitable, full of fun, paVs the only one who knows 
how to tell a story that really convulses you . . .cute 
as they come with a cherubic face . . .definitely mis- 
leading . . . does the worrying for all her friends. 









BARBARA ELIZABETH TAYLOR 

Barb, 105 Grand St., Altamont, N. Y. Library 
Science, ("lass Treasurer, 1; Clubs: Musical 
Association, 1, 2, 8, 4; 020, 8; Committees: Old 
English Dinner, 4; May Party, 3; Daisy Chain; 
Baccalaureate and Commencement Choir, 1, 2, 
3; Song Leader, 4. 

as unpredictable as boston weather . . .crazy, about 
music, crazy about clothes, crazy about books, and 
well, just plain crazy. . .but fun! 





AUDREY MARILYN THOMPSON 

168 Aspinwall Ave., Brookline, Mass. Business. 
NEWS, 3, 4; Clubs: Outing, 1, 2; Scribunal, 1, 2, 
3, 4; USSA, 3, 4. 

the harlequin yal . . .takes her skiing standing up 
. . .most diplomatic about sharing the armed 
services. . .imagines herself a siren, but under- 
neath it all is sweet and lovely . . .groans over basic 
black dresses, but is a dream in white evening 
clothes. 



R. BARBARA TOSDAL 

3249 Woodlawn Blvd., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Prince. Transfer from St. Olaf College, North- 
field, Minn, and University of Minnesota. 



SONIA TRABUN 

So, 69 Park Drive, Boston, Mass. Science. 
NEWS, 3, 4; Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; 
Musical Association, 1, 2; Committees: Class 
Executive, 2; Junior Welcome; Daisy Chain. 

take equal parts: perennial knitting needles, p.m., 
and an infectious laugh .. spice with: eternal 
butts, a delicious blond feather cut and dates 
galore. . .mix well. . .results: one swell gal. 




HARRIET TRAUB 

3209 Meadow-brook Blvd., Cleveland Hts., Ohio. 
Preprofessional. Menorah, 1; Committees: Jun- 
ior Welcome; Daisy Chain. 

a yonng lady who believes that charm and grace 
are the priceless companions to femininity, but 
cherishes equally other forms of companionship . . . 
displays a keen interest in her studies, dates, and 
wardrobe. 



MARJORIE VAIL 

Marge, 7901 4th Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. Home 
Economics. Clubs: Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; 
Outing, 1; Unity, 2; Daisy Chain; Commence- 
ment Usher, 3. 

a generous dose of honesty anil neatness plus popu- 
larity and good sense. . .special likes are tennis 
and ping pong, plus poetry, chocolate and dancing 
. . . has strong beliefs. 




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PRISCILLA RUTH WALKE 

Pris, 143 Loring Ave., Salem, Mass. Science. 
Academy, 3, 4; Clubs: Dramatic, 1, 2; Ellen 
Richards, 2, 3, 4; English, 1; Baccalaureate and 
Commencement Choir, 3. 

the gal who always sends the trains off without her 
, . .partial to cats and knitting, and oh, the spag- 
hetti. . can sleep on a picket fence, but never 
misses a trick. 



SYLVIA LOUISE WALSH 

14 Linden St., Manchester, Conn. Business. 
Clubs: Musical Association, 1; Pan American, 1; 
Scribunal, 3. 

her bine eyes sparkle when she sees a magazine, 
any time, any place. . "i just lore noodles and 
cold baked beans" .. .and ensigns and football 
games, we might add. . a bostonian at heart but 
dreams of cross-country trued in the future. 




URSULA L. WALZ 

Ursie, 281 School St., Belmont, Mass. Science. 
Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; Outing, 2, 3, 4; 
Daisy Chain. 

ursie appears quiet, but "still waters run deep" . . . 
likes outdoor sports, music and lemonades... 
lores to ktiit, cook and sew. . considerate and 
sincere. . is conscientious and has a will of her 
own. . appreciates good jokes but never remembers 
them. 



MARY A. WARREN 

Mimi, Dorset, Vermont. Nursing. Anne Strong 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

a grin, a giggle, and then a ttcht . . ardent about 
magazine stories, clothes in good taste, and a good 
night's sleep. . .goes at a canter all the time on 
duty, but still has energy for vigorous bull sessions 
and plenty of dates. 



NANCY WASHBURN 

Washie, 79 Hesseltine Ave., Melrose, Mass. 
Nursing. Anne Strong Club, 2, 3, 4. 

a gleam in her eye, a laugh up her sleeve. . travels 
down east to Canada . . . prudence, patients and 
pussies are tops with her. . humorous, friendly 
and full of fun. 





LENORA WEINSTEIN 

Lee, 93 Ballon Ave., Dorchester, Mass. Library 
Science. Clubs: Menorah, 1, 2; Hillel, 3, 4; 020, 
2, 3, 4. 

true to herself and her friends, sincere in her desire 
to help, she has won all respect . . ambition is to 
be a librarian in alaska . . .lores hot dogs ami argu- 
ments, hates lobster and hats. . .never too busy to 
talk "just for a minute." 



Dance 

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(MRS.) RITA S. WEISS 

Keel, 11 Gray St., Cambridge, Mass. Prepro- 
fessional. Clubs: Dramatic, President, 8; Meno- 
rah, 8; Outing, 3; Musical Association, 3; Daisy 

Chain. 

lively curiosity about everything. . .cosmopolitan, 
fiery-eyed redhead with temperament to match. . . 
has a tiki in/ for bargain hunting and egg shampoos 
. . .occupies the dual role of wife and student. 





MARIE-CLARE WELCH 

Welchie, 53 Pinewood Rd., Needham, Mass. 
Home Economics. NEWS, 2, 3, 4; Executive 
Board, 2; Clubs: Outing, 1, 2; Newman, 1, 2; 
Home Economics, 2, 3, 4; Committees: Hobo 
Party, 4; Daisy Chain; Setiior Luncheon Wait- 
ress; Baccalaureate, Commencement and Presi- 
dent's Reception Usher, 3. 

strong attachment for an old worn-out pair of 
loafers. . .all-round sportswoman. 



MARY ELIZABETH WHALEN 

204 Blue Hills Pkwy., Milton, Mass. English. 
MICROCOSM, Associate Editor, 4; FEN 
WAYS, Assistant Feature Editor, 4; Clubs: 
English, 1; Musical Association, 1; Newman, 1; 
Committees: Junior Welcome; Daisy Chain; 
Commencement Usher, 3. 

fiery interest in politics, lores discussions . . . 
good sense of humor. . admittedly laughs at her 
own jokes .. .quiet charm .. smooth dresser. 



(MRS.) JANICE WHITE GOLAND 

Jan, 19 Vinal St., Brighton, Mass. Preprofes- 
sional. 

a charming nary lieutenant's wife. . .lovely figure 
and a pretty face . . lores keeping house and enter- 
taining. . a keen Spanish enthusiast who is eagerly 
looking forward to a trip to south america. 




JUNE McCLURE WHITFIELD 

33 Walnut St., Somerville, Mass. Business. 
Class Secretary, 4; NEWS, 3, 4; Clubs: YWCA, 
4; USSA, 3, 4; Scribunal, 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 2; 
Unity, 1; Orchestra, 3, 4; Committees: Daisy 
Chain; Junior Prom; Baccalaureate and Com- 
mencement LTsher, 3. 

composite of eager enthusiasm, school spirit, gener- 
osity and friendliness . . likes outdoor sports and 
vacations in maine. 



ALICE LOUISE WHITTAKER 

Witty, 479 Valley Place, Englewood, N. J. 
Home Economics. Academy, 4; Home Econo- 
mics Club; Committees: Assembly Suggestion, 
4; Old English Dinner, 4. 

never too busy to lend a helping hand. . .loves to 
cook and turns out a pie or dinner with equal ease 
and success. . .rates plenty of a\i and still has time 
for those extra doings. . .pet likes, kittens and the 
color red. 




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KATHLEEN DEXTER WISWELL 

Butchie, 192 E. Emerson St., Melrose, Mass. 
Science. Clubs: Ellen Richards, 2, 3, 4; Newman, 
1, 2, 3; Baccalaureate and Commencement 
Choir, 3. 

her name isn't butch for nothing. . great sports 
fan and despite her size, can throw a mean ball. . . 
a second ivordsworth . . .sincere, quick-witted, with 
a laugh all her own. . .a good quartet just isn't, 
without her. 



JEAN MIRIAM WOOD 

Woodie, 170 Hampshire St., Holyoke, Mass. 
Preprofessional. Musical Association, 3; Trea- 
surer, 4; Dorm Council, 3. 

her thoughts are always with that auburn-haired 
navy pilot .. .begins inevitably with "well frankly 
...".. .she's the gal with the very smooth hair-do 
and the flair for clothes with a personal touch. 




MARY DOROTHY WOOD 

M.G.W., 100 High St., St. Albans, Vt. Nursing. 
Academy, 3, 4; Clubs: Anne Strong, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Outing, *2; Unity, 1; YWCA, 1; Musical Associ- 
ation, 1, 2. 



JEAN NATALIE YOUNG 

Jeanie, 39 Kilsythe Rd„ Arlington, Mass. 
Library School. Clubs: Christian Science, 2, 
Chairman, 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais, 1 ; 020 Presi- 
dent, 4; Inter-Club Council, 4; Committees: 
Assembly Suggestion, 4; Daisy Chain. 

jeanie with the dark brown hair... lull, well 
groomed .. main interests divided between Sim- 
mons college and a certain ensign. 



JACQUELINE BERNICE ZELDIN 

Jackie, 5 Maplewood St., Watertown. Library 
Science. Class Executive Board, 4; Clubs: Eng- 
lish, 1; Hillel, 4; Le Cercle Francais, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
020, 2, Treasurer, 3; Secretary, 4; Orchestra, 1; 
Daisy Chain; Baccalaureate and Commence- 
ment Choir, 3. 

miser of the tea bag . . never opens her mouth with- 
out putting her size five foot into it. 





FRANCES FLYNN 

Fran, 35 Harbor View Ave., Winthrop, Mass. 
English. NEWS, 1, Head Typist, 2, Editorial 
Board, 3; Clubs: Newman, 1, 2, 3, 4; Le Cercle 
Francais, 1, 2. 

take a spot of tea, mix with irish humor and wit 
and there's fran .. bartlett's quotations rival 
incarnate. . .has the biggest heart this side of a 
b.s.. . .and that heart has room for everyone. 






_ j._. 



Xf& 



ADELE M. LANDAU 

Connie, 32 Chambers St., Boston, Mass. Pre- 
professional. Clubs: Menorah, 2; Hillel, 3, Vice 
President, 4; Outing, 3. 

the third member of catie, jean, and udele, inc. . . . 
liken Spanish music, dancing and pizza. . ambi- 
tion is to read marx, leant and nietzsche. . ."do you 
play club convention?" 





FRANCES D. LEWIS 

Fran, 7 Amboy St., Allston, Mass. Preprofession- 
al. Academy, 3; U.S.S.A., President, 3; YWCA 
1, Treasurer, 2. 

sophistication plus. . .poise and social aplomb. . . 
intelligence with a capital i. . definite argumenta- 
tive powers. . ambition, a mink scarf. 



Alma Mat&i 

Hail, Alma Mater! We pledge our love to thee. 
Bring thee our hearts and hands in full loyalty, 
Praising thy counsel and trusting thy truth. 
Lift we our song to thee: Oh guide thou our youth! 
Lift we our song to thee : Oh bless now our youth ! 
Make us, thy children, generous and just, 
Send us to labor when leave thee we must, 
Ready for service and worthy of trust. 




H 



BWaMEMI 



The Office of the Registrar 

The Office of the Alumnae Association 

Marilyn Matson, Ex-Editor-in-Chief, 
to whom we are deeply grateful for 
her work on the 1945 Microcosm 



CONTRIBUTORS 



Ruth Alsen 
Betty Anderson 
Virginia Bilmazes 
Vera Buinitsky 
Dorothy Burdick 
Jean Cohen 
Jacqueline Cross 
Barbara Dearden 
Hazel Eaton 
Patricia Goodnow 
Althea Hanson 
Laneya Heath 
Pauline Hill 
Suzanne Kaldeck 
Elinor King 
Gloria Landsman 
Lucille Lundy 
Audrey Livingston 
Frances Madden 



Elsie Mainwaring 
Marie Murphy 
Dorothy Ranks 
Nancy Rich 
Yolanda Romanelli 
Ann Ross 
Irene Saint 
Lois Samuda 
Barbara Seim 
Betty Sjostrom 
Martha Stiles 
Peggy Stratton 
Trudi Takayama 
Audrey Thompson 
Cynthia Tucker 
June Whitfield 
Margaret Wilson 
Jean Young 
Jacqueline Zeldin 



[ 122] 



— 



HAYDEN COSTUME & CO., Inc. 

COSTUMES for the Amateur Stage, 

Plays, Operas, Carnivals, Pageants, 

Masquerades 



786 WASHINGTON STREET • BOSTON, MASS. 

HAN cock 4346 



QuaUujlcu}, 9ce, Qte&m 



since 



1882 




Famous for 

GOOD FOODS 

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PERFUMERY 

S. S. PIERCE CO. 

STORE AT 133 BROOKLINE AVENUE 



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With a 


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ASPinwall 5000 



BATCHELDER & SNYDER 
Company, Inc. 

Boston • Massachusetts 



Producers and ^Distributors of 
Fine Foods 



L G. BALFOUR COMPANY 



ATTLEBORO, MASS. 



Commencement Invitations 
Class Rings and Pins 
Personal Cards 

Represented by S. G. LEE 

230 Boylston St. 
Boston, Massachusetts 



BARNABY, Inc. 

FLORISTS 

LONgwood 5626 

11 HARVARD STREET 
BROOKLINE, MASS. 



McCarthy & simon, inc. 



230 BOYLSTON STREET 
BOSTON 



7-9 WEST 36th STREET 
NEW YORK 



Specialists in Choir Vestments, Pulpit Gowns 
Caps, Gowns, Hoods for all degrees 

SEILER'S Inc. - Restaurant 

Wellesley Square, Wellesley 

Open Every Day Except Monday 

Caterers since 1873 

Office - 110 NORWAY STREET - BOSTON 




"TABHCHiea * 




Wt>VRT SHORT VAMPS 


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hand sewn moccasins 


— because we know good moccasins are a must 


with our college friends . . 


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them in stock in all sizes . . 


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1 360 Beacon Street 


Coolidge Corner 



Symphony Hall 

POPS 

60th Season 

85 Symphony Players 
ARTHUR FIEDLER, Conductor 

—OPENING— 

Tuesday, May 1st. 



SIMMONS NIGHT 

SATURDAY, MAY 12th 



HOTEL 
STATLER 

BOSTON 



Appreciates the con- 
tinued patronage of 
SIMMONS COLLEGE 
Students and Alumnae. 



D. B. STANBRO, 

Manager 



• 



Complete Photographic Service 



to the 



1945 "MIC 



§ 



SARGENT STUDIO 

154 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 







76e TZovie Wfate 0%c6M 

* More than a thousand year books have borne the 
imprint of New England's Master Craftsmen. 

Many business managers and editors of year books 
in the school and college field have written us in 
appreciation of our cooperation and helpful sug- 
gestions. This, of course, has been very gratifying 
to us and we are looking forward to the years 
ahead with the same spirit of helpfulness to the 
business managers and editors of the future. 

Ti/oriceAt&i S*tyt&vwfy @omfca*uf 



FORMERLY HOWARD-WESSON CO. 



44 PORTLAND STREET, WORCESTER 8, MASSACHUSETTS 

NEW ENGLAND'S LARGEST COLLEGE ENGRAVERS 



~i 



■I 



- - 




The Insigne of Quality Printing . . . 



For nearly a century and a half The 
Andover Press has been a leader in 
producing well -printed books. Despite 
war-time restrictions, every effort is 
being made to maintain the reputation 
for quality printing and personal cooper- 
ation built up over this long period. 

We are proud to add this volume of 
the 1945 MICROCOSM to the select 
list of books bearing The Insigne of 
Quality Printing. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 

Andover, Massachusetts 



AN 
ILLUSTRATED HISTORY 
OF FOUR EVENTFUL YEARS AT 
SIMMONS COLLEGE, DESIGNED IN THE 
MODERN MANNER, COMPILED, WRITTEN, EDITED 
AND ILLUSTRATED BY SIMMONS GIRLS FOR SIMMONS 
GIRLS. A LIMITED EDITION, PRIVATELY PRINTED, OF 
THREE HUNDRED AND TWENTY COPIES PRODUCED FOR ITS 
SUBSCRIBERS, THE TYPE DESTROYED AFTER THE PRINTING. 
IN THE BODY OF THE BOOK THE TYPE USED IS SCOTCH ROMAN, 
A TYPE THAT IS QUITE MODERN IN CUT. THE DISPLAY TYPE 
IS KAUFMANN SCRIPT. THE PAPER USED IS SEVENTY-POUND 
ENAMEL OF THE BEST GRADE, THE COVER MATERIAL IS 
FABRIKOID, AND THE PRINTING PLATES ARE PHOTO- 
ENGRAVINGS ON ZINC AND COPPER. THE BOOK IS 
BOUND IN SIXTEEN-PAGE SIGNATURES. THE 
VOLUME WAS COMPLETED IN JUNE, 1945, 
DURING THE SENIOR YEAR 
AT SIMMONS. 







-i 



■ 



376, i 
St, 



NOT FC. -ULATION